Injustices & Inequalities: Covid-19 – Edition 11

The current Covid-19 pandemic has disproportionately affected communities and people who were already marginalised, discriminated, and at the throng of continuous injustices and inequalities. We are bringing together stories, investigations from around the world to highlight and advocate and create the important exposure to leverage and bring about positive changes.


In the 11th edition of the Journal on “Injustice & Inequalities: Covid-19”, we present the work of Guilherme
Bergamini which exposes some of the contradictory messages given by government officials.
At the start of the pandemic, Guilherme listed 27 countries cited in the news above published on March 3, 2020, He searched Google “Street View” at random and appropriated each photograph, covering the people in the image with red circles.
The monitoring carried out by the Federal Government is contradictory for what he observed in the actions taken by the President of the Federative Republic of Brazil. What is at stake, as he understands it, are the lives of millions of Brazilians who survive each day with minimal wage or nothing, an unjustifiable and impractical social inequality.

Photo editor: Cinzia D’Ambrosi

STAY AT HOME IT’S NOT A WEAK FLU!

Photography and text by Guilherme Bergamini

Total deaths from COVID-19 in Brazil until June 2, 2021
                                        465.312 lives
i
©Guilherme Bergamini

Searching the Internet about the new COVID-19 around the world, I saw the website of the Ministry of Health of Brazil. I came across a list of 27 countries that are being monitored by the Federal Government.
I listed these 27 countries cited in the news above published on March 3, 2020, I searched in Google “Street View” at random and appropriated each photograph, covering the people in the image with red circles.
This monitoring carried out by the Federal Government is contradictory for what I observe in the actions taken by the President of the Federative Republic of Brazil. What is at stake, if he understands it, are the lives of millions of Brazilians who survive each day with minimal wage or nothing, an unjustifiable and impractical social inequality.
And in this conflict of vanities, interests and power, we can come to an unprecedented tragedy.
Never imagined that i would live an experience of pandemic and social confinement. From that I remember a passage from the inauguration speech of the President-elect of the Federative Republic of Brazil, Jair Bolsonaro, on January 1, 2019, in Brasília, in the Federal District, Brazil:

May God bless this great nation. Brazil above all. God above all. This is our flag, which will never be red. It will only be red if our blood is needed to keep it green and yellow.” – Part of the inauguration speech of the President-elect of the Federative Republic of Brazil, Jair Bolsonaro.

©Guilherme Bergamini
©Guilherme Bergamini

http://guilhermebergamini.com/fiquem-em-casa-nao-e-uma-gripezinha/

Biography

Reporter photographic and visual artist, Guilherme Bergamini is Brazilian and graduated in Journalism. For more than two decades, he has developed projects with photography and the various narrative possibilities that art offers. The works of the artist dialogue between memory and social political criticism. He believes in photography as the aesthetic potential and transforming agent of society. Awarded in national and international competitions, Guilherme Bergamini participated in collective exhibitions in 44 countries.

Guilherme Bergamini
www.guilhermebergamini.com 
Mob: +55 31 999523047 

Facebook: Guilherme Bergamini
Instagram: guilhermebergamini

Lateral Thinkers in Germany

Photography and text by Cassiel Kanter

In Germany, people have been protesting against the corona measures of the federal government for more than a year. In terms of content, the spectrum ranges from citizens who want to point out the importance of the fundamental right of assembly to vaccination opponents, esoterics, general sceptics of the state and conspiracy theorists. Right-wing extremists and “Reichsbüger” can also be found at the demonstrations. The inner core of the “Querdenker” scene is monitored by the German domestic intelligence service, among other things because of overlaps with the extreme right-wing scene. The official goal of the in Germany called “Querdenker” is the unrestricted restoration of the currently partially restricted basic rights: “We insist on the first 20 articles of our constitution”, they say in a one-page manifesto. These are, in particular, the abolition of the restrictions on fundamental rights imposed by the “Corona Ordinance”. At moment, the situation in Germany is calming down, as more and more people are being vaccinated and the pandemic is hopefully moving towards its end.

Cassiel Kanter
Insta: cassielkanterphoto
twitter: MartinStopsel

All photos copyright ©Cassiel Kanter

Photojournalism Nights 15TH Edition

Photojournalism Hub 15th edition of the Photojournalism Nights presents a superb line-up of guest photographers: Carolina Rapezzi Denise Laura BakerSimon King.

23rd July 2021 06:30 pm

White City Place, The WestWorks,
195 Wood Lane
London
W12 7FQ

To join here

Ghana, Accra, November 2018. Rashida is a young girl originally from the North of Ghana, she sells water in the scrap yard of Agbogbloshie. Along with other girls living in the area, she carries water bags into a wheelbarrow and sell them for 1 Ghanaian Cedi each (the equivalent of £0,15) to workers who need to extinguish the fire and cool down the copper extracted from burning cables, wires and other appliances.

Carolina Rapezzi is an award-winning photographer based in London, part of the collective Women Photograph. Her works focus on social, humanitarian and environmental issues. She worked on migration issues in Sicily and France, covered the 100th anniversary of the Russian Revolution in Moscow and St. Petersburg, followed several protest movements in London, including the more recent Black Lives Matter and, since 2018 she has been working on environmental issues. Her independent project Burning Dreams on electronic waste in Ghana has been awarded internationally and exhibited multiple times: Portrait of Humanity 2019, Winner Flash Forward 2019, Winner 1st Prize Single Images, Winner World Water Day 2020, Shortlisted Sony World Photography 2020, Winner Siena International Award 2020.

©DeniseLauraBaker

Denise Laura Baker is a photojournalist, documentary, and portrait photographer. Her work draws on influences from the many different strands of her career, particularly her time as an ethnographic psychologist where she interviewed and collected the stories of the people with whom she worked. She has been exhibiting since 2016 and have, exhibited at various locations in Wales, including holding her first solo exhibition as part of LLAWN 2019 (Llandudno arts Weekend). She is the recipient of an Arts Council for Wales R&D grant for a project examining interconnecting communities within Gwynedd, Conwy and Ynys Mon. She also teaches and give talks on the role of narrative in photography and photo book making.

©Simon King

Simon King is a documentary photographer, currently working on a series of long-term projects, all on 35mm film. Simon teaches at UAL, and with Leica Akademie (UK). Simon works with the collective New Exit Group to publish photo-essays highlighting intimate, local stories. Simon’s recent publications include BARDO (in collaboration with NEG), a USA Digest which includes work from 2019 – Winter 2021, and Transiting Bulgaria, from his recent time there over Christmas 2020.

The Photojournalism Nights is an event that promotes committed and courageous photojournalism and engages the public to social justice and human rights. To join HERE

Thanks to White City Place for supporting our events

We are back to in-person events!

Join us on the 29th June 06:30pm at White City Place, London W12 7TF for our first in person event since Covid-19 pandemic began.

We are so excited to host ‘How has Covid-19 and Brexit impacted the LGBTQ+ communities?’ Talk event welcoming an amazing group of guest speakers Richard Ansett, Tim Boddy, Gemma Mancinelli, Fazal Mahmood and Teddy Prout.

©Gemma Mancinelli
©Tim Boddy
©Richard Ansett
White City Place

To Join us: https://tinyurl.com/4cn63a4c

How has Covid-19 and Brexit impacted the LGBTQ+ communities?

File_7294 Tina at the site of the Guy Fawkes night fire near her home © Richard Ansett 2016

Join us for a conversation on the impact of Covid-19 and Brexit on the LGBTQ+ communities.

Photojournalism Hub is pleased to host a conversation on the challenges that the LGBTQ+ community face, and the further impact of Brexit and Covid-19 pandemic has had on the community. How can we as individuals and as communities support and address the current challenges? Departing from the photography of Gemma Mancinelli and Tim Boddy, join us in the conversation.

Tim Boddy, is a photographer based in London, and a recent graduate of LCC’s Photojournalism & Documentary Photography MA course. Tim develops personal documentary-based projects outside of his commercial work. His practice generally centres on the LGBTQ+ community, whom he enjoys working alongside to embolden storytelling and to make his work more representative of the community.

Gemma Mancinelli, is a photographer and a visual storyteller based in London. Her dedication to human rights, especially women’s rights, LGBTQ+ and working class, is central in her photographs. Gemma has extensively reported on the movement of protests of the last years, focusing on documenting the people’s stories within.

Fazal Mahmood, Rapid Intervention Worker at St Mungo. Fazal will share his personal experiences, both about the trials, tribulations and the celebrations of the integration of his identity from being a South-Asian Muslim gay man.

Richard Ansett, an award winning photographer known for his provocative images. His images are in permanent collections including the National Portrait Gallery, London and Library and Archives Canada, Bibliothèque Nationale de France and the Smithsonian Institution. His images have been part of major collaborative exhibitions.

TO JOIN US REGISTER HERE

Thanks to White City Place for supporting our events

Cover photo ©Richard Ansett

Injustices & Inequalities: Covid-19 – Edition 10

The current Covid-19 pandemic has disproportionately affected communities and people who were already marginalised, discriminated, and at the throng of continuous injustices and inequalities. We are bringing together stories, investigations from around the world to highlight and advocate and create the important exposure to leverage and bring about positive changes.
In the 10th edition of the Journal on “Injustice & Inequalities: Covid-19”, we present the work of Kasangati Godelive Kabena.
Kasangati shares a photo documentary tracing the complex relationship during the period of confinement imposed by Covid-19 pandemic guidelines and the practice of faith in Kinshasa in DRC. As the practice of faith is very much part of daily life for the communities in Congo and in Kinshasa, Kasangati explores through photographs the emptiness that confinement has created in the society.

Photo editor: Cinzia D’Ambrosi

ALMOST EMPTY
Photography & Text by
KASANGATI GODELIVE KABENA

Il était important pour moi de comprendre un peu cette relation complexe pendant la période de confinement entre le covid-19 et la religion en RDC. Pendant la période de confinement, je suis allé en ville, à Kinshasa (République Démocratique, pays où la majorité de la population est chrétienne) pour voir l’état des églises, les rues presque vides, les lieux étrangers et familiers (amis etc. ). Ces lieux n’étaient plus fréquentés car ils ne pouvaient plus accueillir plus de monde. Cette imposition indirecte et directe était fatale surtout pour les églises aussi pour nos relations amicales etc.

It was important for me to understand a little this complex relationship during the period of confinement imposed by covid-19 pandemic guidelines and the practice of religion in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) . During the period of confinement, I went to town, to Kinshasa, where the majority of the population is Christian to see the state of the churches, the almost empty streets, the foreign and familiar places (friends etc. ). These places were no longer frequented because they could no longer accommodate more people. This indirect and direct imposition was fatal especially for the churches, but also for our friendly relations etc.

proposition-Kasangati-Godelive-Kabena-

Kasangati Godelive Kabesa
Phone: (+243) 818022128 (+233) 595534983
godelivekas7@gamail.com
https://www.eyeem.com/u/30716632
IG: GodeliveKasangati

Us Connected

‘Us Connected’ is a photobook created by women of west London, participants of the Photojournalism Hub programme called ‘Knowing You’, which provides Photography and Storytelling course to train in photography and visual narrative. The project provides a space for women’s self expression, healing and bonding with each other. The resulting learning, empowerment and bonding with each other contributes in community cohesion . During the ‘Knowing You’ programme, women develop a photo story of each other and these are published in a photobook.


The project has been kindly supported by the National Lottery.

Photojournalism Nights 14th edition

Photojournalism Hub fourteenth edition of the Photojournalism Nights presents an amazing line-up of photographers: Arsène Mpiana Monkwe, Beau Patrick Coulon, Justin Makangara.

©Beau Patrick Coulon

Beau Patrick Coulon, Beau Patrick Coulon, Beau Patrick Coulon, is a New Orleans based photographer and filmmaker whose imagery draws from class struggle and sub-cultural movements. At The Photojournalism Nights, Beau will be talking about his latest book, Revel & Revolt, a straightforward-yet-personal book of photography that documents protests, parades, and the punk scene in New Orleans from 2013 to 2020. It is published by Burn Barrel Press and DNO books.

A thief struck in agony this morning by the population. Put on a tray ready to be sacrificed, the police come to their aid and disperse everyone Kinshasa, DR Congo, June 20, 2020. ©Arsene Mpiana

Arsène Mpiana Monkwe, is a photojournalist and active artist based in Kinshasa. Arsène is also a tutor at the Department of Photography at the Academy of Fine Arts in Kinshasa. He has been Nominated for the Joop Swart masterclass (2020) of the World Press Foundation. Ini 2019, he became a freelance writer for Jeune Afrique then joined Agence France-Presse and in 2021, he tried his luck with the New York Times.

©Justin Makangara

Justin Makangara, is an independent photojournalist and documentary photographer based in Kinshasa. His work focuses on underreported developing documentary and storytelling reporting on stories focusing on social justice, politics, music, and daily life. Justin is a member of APJD African Photojournalist Database, VII academy Insider, and Congo in conversation.

The Photojournalism Nights is an event that promotes committed and courageous photojournalism and engages the public to social justice and human rights. To join HERE

Syria, 10 years of war and spring never came

By Flor Castaneda

It’s your turn, Doctor! These words written by some teenagers on the walls of a school under the euphoria that the Arab Springs unleashed, was the beginning of one of the greatest humanitarian crises in all of History.

 It is 10 years of a war in which foreign powers, terrorist groups and the government of Bashar Al-Ássad have systematically torn and destroyed the most valuable thing in millenary Syria, its people.  This war has already tainted half the term of Assad, who has been in power for 20 years.

 Until 2020, more than 387,118 people have died and 205,300 disappeared, 32 attacks with chemical weapons and more than 12 thousand dead children, this last decade sounds more like a genocide perpetrated by his own government.

 Surviving extremist groups such as ISIS, chemical attacks and growing poverty, has triggered that almost half of the country’s population has fled, 6.7 million are internally displaced and another 5.6 million are abroad, the latter  It has caused tensions in countries close to Syria such as Lebanon and Turkey and Islamophobia in Western countries.

 Beyond the coldness of the numbers, there is the harsh reality of those who could not leave Syria and survive among ruins waiting for the days of peace, of those who had to sell their possessions to save themselves, ending up stuck in nearby countries where they have to beg for money or food without receiving any kind of help as they do not have refugee status, of children walking the streets of Tripoli in Lebanon selling cookies and prostituting themselves to locals and travelers to earn a living, of women who give birth in the worst  conditions, of men who were not combatants but were wounded when trying to flee and cannot work to support their own.

 One thing is real and obvious, the Syrian people with the bleeding wound of a decade of war led by the only dictator who survived the Arab Spring, hope to return to their land and rebuild it.

 Syria sleeps scattered among tents while dying among ruins, famine and chemical weapons, Syria has a smile mixed with a lost look from longing for so much, from praying that perhaps one day the war will end.

Flor Castaneda
Insta: florc_84

All photos copyrighted ©Flor Castaneda