PJHub Photographer in Residence

Meet Mohamed Gabode, our Photographer-in-Residence from Mogadishu, Somalia.

Photojournalism Hub would like to present Mohamed Gabobe, our Photographer in Residence for 2023.

We are excited about this collaboration and we are looking forward to sharing Mohamed’s work. In this role, Mohamed will be sharing photographs that document life in Mogadishu, Somalia. Mohamed’s background is in investigative journalism and has a wealth of experiences and insights working on challenging topics, including a report to expose illegal deforestation in Somalia to feed charcoal global demands. Nevertheless, Mohamed has also a very keen photographic eye and he is working more and more with telling stories with photographs.
This residency is an opportunity to get to know Mohamed better through his photographs, which will be an inspiration to discover new perspectives on the culture, the places and the people of Mogadishu. We look forward to working with Mohamed and developing further discussions with him. We hope that you will enjoy his work and reach out to Mohamed with any questions.

Mohamed Gabobe, who is a Somali-American investigative journalist based in Mogadishu, Somalia with a passion for photography.

Mohamed has spent a number of years on the ground in Somalia covering stories ranging from investigative stories, human interest stories and breaking news events. His work has been featured on an array of international media outlets.  His most recent investigative report on the massive levels of deforestation in Somalia linked to the lucrative demand for charcoal, most recently published by The Guardian . His work can also be read on the Byline Times newspaper, including his investigative pieces on war crimes and crimes against humanity committed by African Union peacekeepers in Somalia. Mohamed has reported countless more similar stories throughout the years that pertain to Somalia and more recently he is using more and more his camera to accompany his pieces.
Mohamed Gabobe
Twitther: Mohamed_Gabobe

#mohamedgabobe

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Photojournalism Nights 30th edition

©Samira Oulaillah
©Natisha Mallick

25th January 2023, 18:30 – 21:30 
The Invention Rooms
Imperial College Door C
68 Wood Lane
London W12 7T

More info, and to book HERE

Photojournalism Hub presents Natisha Mallick and Samira Oulaillah to the 30th edition of the Photojournalism Nights event at The Invention Rooms, Imperial College London.

Both award winning photographers work on under-reported topics that need incredible courage and access to be able to tell, including Natisha’ stories on Muslim men being falsely implicated in terror cases and the challenges of child birth in India, and Samira’s project ‘Breaking the Silence’, exploring the testimonies of former Israeli soldiers who quit the army to join an organization called “Breaking the Silence” – founded in 1995 by former soldiers- who decided to testify against their own actions in the occupied territories.

Natisha Mallick is a computer engineer by education and a documentary photographer who focused her work on under-reported stories in India. She hopes that her images contribute to the public enhancement of unbalanced situations. Her work has been published in Spiegel Online, The Wire, The Quint, Fountain Ink Magazine, The Irish Times, Scroll, Catch News, Private Photo Review and L’ oeil de la photographie. Shortlisted twice for the Marilyn Stafford Foto Reportage Award in 2018 & 2017 for her work on Muslim Men falsely implicated in terror cases. Natisha’s work on Child Births in Rural India was awarded the Child Survival Media Award by National Foundation for India and Save the children and was also shortlisted for the Photocrati Fund. She was the recipient of the Neel Dongre Grant by India Photo Archive Foundation and the Oslo University College Grant. Interested in Data Stories, Natisha is transitioning into the tech/data space and presently working towards her Masters in Big Data Science from Queen Mary University of London. http://natishamallick.com/

Samira Oulaillah, a French filmmaker and documentary photographer, has extensively worked in the last ten years on global issues related to war, refugees, gender issues, child poverty and racial discrimination, producing numerous documentaries for international cable television and presenting documentary photography for various media outlets and NGOs. She has widely travelled across the world to shoot hard-hitting documentaries and immersive photographic reportages that give a voice to the voiceless and a face to the forgotten. Samira holds an MA in Documentary Photography & Photojournalism (UAL London College of Communication) and an MA in Social History (Winchester University). She is currently preparing a PhD with the Sorbonne University in Paris and working on the impact of white colonial photography in West Africa on the representation of native people and the revival of African identity and collective memory through the work of contemporary Malian photographer Malick Sidibé and Senegalese photographer Oumar Ly. https://samira.photoshelter.com/

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Consider becoming a member of the Photojournalism Hub and receive the benefits of free access to events, Photojournalism Hub resources, premier editorial content, portfolio reviews, photography exhibitions, discounts on our courses and training, whilst you will be supporting our work advocating, advancing social justice and human rights. If there were ever a time to join us, it is now. Support the Photojournalism Hub from as little as £1 every month. If you can, please consider supporting us with a regular amount each month. Thank you. JOIN US HERE

CAPTURING CRISIS

We are very pleased to present the second edition of Capturing Crisis photography and reporting magazine produced by the group of youths attending the ‘Stories, Reporting Mag, Photography Course’ course.

In this edition, you can find photo stories and articles that highlight and reflect on dramatic environmental changes in west London. Furthermore, the impact of living crisis on restaurants owned by minority groups, the life of a taxi driver, visual documentation of the world of teens crossing into adulthood and much more. We would like to thank Hammersmith & Fulham Borough, Sobus, NHS north west and the National Lottery for their support and to the young people for their commitment, talent and drive demonstrated.

Front Cover Image ©Acacia Diana
Back Cover Image @Sól Eiriksdottir

BECOME A PJH MEMBER
Consider becoming a member of the Photojournalism Hub and receive the benefits of free access to events, Photojournalism Hub resources, premier editorial content, portfolio reviews, photography exhibitions, discounts on our courses and training, whilst you will be supporting our work advocating, advancing social justice and human rights. If there were ever a time to join us, it is now. Support the Photojournalism Hub from as little as £1 every month. If you can, please consider supporting us with a regular amount each month. Thank you. Join usHERE

Photojournalism Hub Calendar 2023

This year, we have asked 12 award winning photojournalists and documentary photographers who have collaborated with the Photojournalism Hub to showcase their work with one photo each in our curated Calendar 2023. We would like to thank the photographers for their kind support.
The Photojournalism Hub Calendar 2023 is available for pre-order. HERE  
For PJHub members: HERE
If you would like to purchase a copy and you are living outside of the UK, please contact us for shipping costs.
All the proceedings from the sales of the Calendar 2023 will go towards the continuation of our work in research based visual documentation, Photojournalism Nights, Interviews, Photo stories. Thank you in advance for your support promoting the work of independent photojournalism that helps the advancement, advocacy and protection of human rights and social justice.

CAPTURING CRISIS

I am incredibly pleased to present the first edition of ‘Capturing Crisis’ photography and reporting magazine produced by our youths group living in west London participating in the ‘Stories, Reporting Mag, Photography Course’ project.
In this first edition of ‘Capturing the Crisis’, we present photo stories and articles on the impact of the cost of living crisis on various communities in London. It includes personal and introspective stories of people living the crisis as well as stories reflecting on the way the city of London is rapidly changing as a result of it. Nonetheless, the photography is particularly captivating as each participant is developing their individual style and line of research. I hope you enjoy this first edition and will follow and support the ‘Capturing Crisis’ magazine.
I am very proud for the commitment, talent and drive demonstrated by the young participants.

‘Capturing Crisis’ is been produced by young participants of the ‘Stories, Reporting Mag, Photography Course run by the Photojournalism Hub and funded by Hammersmith & Fulham Council, NHS north west London, Sobus, National Lottery Community Fund. We are very grateful for the support provided.

BECOME A PJH MEMBER
Consider becoming a member of the Photojournalism Hub and receive the benefits of free access to events, Photojournalism Hub resources, premier editorial content, portfolio reviews, photography exhibitions, discounts on our courses and training, whilst you will be supporting our work advocating, advancing social justice and human rights. If there were ever a time to join us, it is now. Support the Photojournalism Hub from as little as £1 every month. If you can, please consider supporting us with a regular amount each month. Thank you. Join usHERE

ONLINE ONE-TO-ONE PORTFOLIO AND/OR PROJECT REVIEWS

They escaped Syria and went to Turkey where they were badly treated and after months of hell they managed to leave and enter Greece. Most refugees reach Europe having suffered severe traumas. Yet, many are hardly receiving adequate care and linger for weeks and months in refugee camps. Lavrion, Greece.

Under the guidance of documentary photographer and photojournalist Cinzia D’Ambrosi, this session is about having your portfolio and/or your ongoing photography project reviewed and given tailored advice for it to be submitted to an Open Call, presented to editors, or proposed for funding.
The session will not only provide individual feedback on specific project development but also consideration on what is the best way to present and publish it and guidance on moving forward. You will receive help to advance and complete the finishing phase of a project and bringing it ready for publishing.
The two hour session will provide tailored review of a portfolio of photography work with feedback on its presentation, and where best to be shown for opportunities in gaining photography commissions, assignments as well as opportunities for growing your existing photography network and business. Moreover, it will be an opportunity to also explore ideas on reaching out to the people that are envisioned in your photographic stories.
Every session is an unique experience where you can ask specific questions, receive advice and ideas for expanding your network.
Relevant key areas explored in your one to one session are: tools for improving your practice, exploring narrative choices and intentions, finding your individual vision, identifying your public, advancing your visual voice.

Cinzia D’Ambrosi, is a multi-award winning freelance documentary photographer and photojournalist and the founder/director of the Photojournalism Hub photography curator and photo editor. Cinzia’s work focuses on systemic violence, racism, marginalised communities, and migration. She contributes to a number of editorials such as Der Spiegel, New Internationalist, Warscapes, BBC, The Guardian. She frequently works for charities, NGO’s and the third sector producing stories for advocacy campaigns and exhibitions. She has collaborated over a number of years with Amnesty International in Europe presenting her project Hate Hurtswhich documents security and police violence against refugees in Europe, in touring exhibitions, solo exhibitions, publications, guest talks, in extensive campaigns, and broadcasted in various TV and radio outlets, including Czech National TV. Furthermore, Hate Hurts was selected for the European Month of Photography in Bulgaria (2018), won an Award from the Photographers Gallery in London (2017), toured as a solo exhibition throughout Czech Republic for a year in 2019-2020 supported by Amnesty International Czech Republic. Cinzia’s photography work has received support and commissions from Arts Council England, Big Local Trust, Amnesty International, Westfield Group London, German Refugee Council to name a few. Cinzia has received the Spiga d’Argento Award (2022) for her photojournalism for the advancement of Peace. She is a contributing photographer for Zuma Press

PHOTOJOURNALISM HUB: END OF YEAR INSTA SHOWCASE 2022

This year, for The End of Year Instagram Showcase, we invited photo editor and photography consultant Will Carleton from Photo Archive News to select a number of photographs submitted by photographers that have been involved with the PJ Hub in 2022.
In anticipation to Will Carleton’s curation, we would like to share some of the photographs submitted demonstrating the commitment, talent, exploration of unseen or forgotten areas of society to advocate and advance social justice. An example of the work submitted are stories from the Democratic Republic of Congo by Justin Makangara and Arsene Mpiana, the work by Richard Zubelzu capturing the powerful sentiment for the liberation of women in Iran, the protests in Bolivia by Josue Cortez, the work by Encarni Pindado on the Search for Disappeared Persons allegedly killed by the cartel near Los Mochis, Mexico, the work of Sebastian Ambrossio documenting the various layers of Argentinian society, the impact of waste on the Guatemalan coastline with a focus on Livingston by @Maria Tomas Rodriguez and the coverage of one of the rallies in solidarity of Child Q, the fifteen-year-old strip-searched black girl, and all the black girls that are daily adultified and dehumanised in England by Sabrina Merolla. The Photojournalism Hub End of Year Instagram Showcase starts on the 21st December 2022. To view the entries and lean more join us HERE .

Women for Iran/ Mujeres por Iran ©Richard Zubelzu
Ms. Sylvie, a resident of Kananga, Democratic Republic of Congo, poses in front of a colonial building that was used for various purposes, including as a housing camp for teachers of a school dating from the colonial era. ©Justin Makangara
In a world where the debate on identities is problematic, there is reason to dwell on the question. “Passport” explores the duality of attitudes adopted by certain individuals who, taking advantage of this travel document,
change their identity each time, who, taking advantage of this travel document, change their identity each time. It is a question of questioning the influences that people undergo (from the glance of the society) when they want to show themselves especially in public, far from any authentic idea. Inspired at the height of the new coronavirus pandemic, this work is to be seen as a quest for lost, forgotten or simply, defeated identity. ©Arsene Mpiana Monkwe
Patricia Flores along with prosecutors, authorities and the Sinaloa Regional Commission for the Search for Disappeared Persons watch as her son digs up the remains of a person in a field allegedly used by the cartel to kill and disappear people near Los Mochis. Photo: © Encarni Pindado for The Sunday Times
 A cocalero returns a tear gas grenade against riot police during the conflict in the Villa El Carmen area. (Peace)
The conflict has escalated between the government and the cocaleros due to the existence of an illegal market parallel to that of their institution. La Paz, Bolivia on August 10, 2022. ©JOSUE CORTEZ
“Oración a Forastero” (Prayer to a Stranger) 2022, Una mujer reza la Oración al señor de los milagros de Mailín frente a la imagen de la virgen en la parte de atrás del altar del Santuario de la Virgen del Rosario de San Nicolás. 
<<Cada fotografía que miramos es una ventana abierta sobre una realidad y sobre un instante. Una fotografía es al mismo tiempo lo que más se acerca al proyecto imposible que sería la representación de un pensamiento>> Jean-Claude Lemagny. ‘L’ombre et le temps’ París 1992 ©Sebastian Ambrossio
Livingston is a small coastal municipality in Guatemala only accessible by boat. Its population is predominantly indigenous and tourism is one of the main sources of income. The basins of the local rivers are full of waste due to manifestations of nature, but primarily due to the productive processes of the local population in their daily life. During the rainy season, the flow of the rivers increases, and the waste is dragged to the mouth of the rivers and the sea. This is difficult to reverse, but the pollution caused by man should be solved through environmental education campaigns. Currently there are numerous efforts by the Guatemalan government and several NGOs to clean the coasts, separate waste and make the local population aware of the adverse effects that pollution causes on man, animals, and local vegetation. In 2022 more than 2 tons of waste were removed from Livingston’s coast. ©Maria Tomas Rodriguez
Hackney Town Hall, London, UK, 20th of March 2022. Hundreds of Londoners gather in London’s Hackney Town Hall for a solidarity rally supporting Child Q, the fifteen-year-old strip-searched black girl, and all the black girls that are daily adultified and dehumanised in England. Child Q’s family has now launched civil proceedings against the Metropolitan Police and the school. Published here: 1.www.theguardian.com/society/2022/jul/05/they-saw-me-as-calculating-not-a child-how-adultification-leads-to-black-children-being-treated-as-criminals; 2. https://theconversation.com/amp/whiteness-is-at-the-heart-of-racism-in-britain-so-why-is-it-portrayed-as-a-black-problem-181742 ©Sabrina Merolla

View the selected entries at Photo Archive News
View the Photojournalism Hub End of Year Instagram Showcase

BECOME A PJH MEMBER
Consider becoming a member of the Photojournalism Hub and receive the benefits of free access to events, Photojournalism Hub resources, premier editorial content, portfolio reviews, photography exhibitions, discounts on our courses and training, whilst you will be supporting our work advocating, advancing social justice and human rights. If there were ever a time to join us, it is now. Support the Photojournalism Hub from as little as £1 every month. If you can, please consider supporting us with a regular amount each month. Thank you. Join usHERE