Injustices & Inequalities: Covid-19 – Edition 12

Covid-19 pandemic has disproportionately affected communities and individuals who are poor, marginalised, discriminated; has brought to light the existing inequalities and injustices and in some cases how the impact has generated wider repercussions.

Through an Open Call, began at the heights of the global pandemic in 2020, Photojournalism Hub has been collecting photo stories, articles and multimedia pieces on the impact of Covid-19 on the most vulnerable, including the poor, BAME communities, refugees, the elderly, women, the stateless, and asylum seekers.

The submitted stories have been published on the Photojournalism Hub website providing an independent visual investigation on governments missed opportunities and on the scale of systemic failings which have caused sufferings and losses.

We would like to present this independent visual investigation in a series of public events, including a photography exhibition to present a body of evidential work that would leverage and provide a platform for a public discourse to enable recommendations and key actions, for improved, cohesive and inclusive protection of the most marginalised, discriminated and disadvantaged and would provide accountable points in order to advance to social justice for all.

NUESTROS +ESENCIALES (OUR +ESSENTIALS)

Photography by Sebastian Ambrossio

This Photographic-Documentary Report came from a personal concern to show, narrate and visually document through photographs the work of health professionals, of the essential workers who work in the hospital in Mercedes, and those connected to the hospital who work to combat the pandemic. The project explores how health workers dealt with this virus, leaving everything to give the best to patients.
Blas L. Dubarry Acute General Zone Hospital, Sanitary Region X – Mercedes, Province of Buenos Aires, Argentina.

©Sebastian Ambrossio
©Sebastian Ambrossio

©Sebastian Ambrossio
©Sebastian Ambrossio
©Sebastian Ambrossio
©Sebastian Ambrossio

Photography and text:
Sebastian Ambrossio
@sebastianambrossio

Music:
Rodrigo Almas
@rodrigo_al_mar


ANTI-LOCKDOWNS IN IRELAND

Photography by

Krzysztof Maniocha

Photographer Krzysztof Maniocha has documented anti-lockdown protests in Dublin, Ireland. Ireland had one of the longest lockdowns and some of the most controversial restrictions in Europe.  His photographs are presenting moments of clashes between police and protesters, as well as uncovering the existing issues externalised by the imposed restrictions: religion, identity and people’s resistance.

©Krzysztof Maniocha
©Krzysztof Maniocha
©Krzysztof Maniocha
©Krzysztof Maniocha
©Krzysztof Maniocha

Photography:
Krzysztof Maniocha
@krzysztofmaniocha

Photo editor: Cinzia D’Ambrosi

REPORTING OF WAR, AWAY FROM THE FRONTLINES

The Invention Rooms, Imperial College
Door C, 68 Wood Lane
London
W12 7TA

To join HERE

Russia invaded Ukraine on 24 February 2022, escalating the Russo-Ukrainian War which had begun in 2014. During the past eleven weeks, photographers and journalists have reported from field, many of the images have captured the deadly events that have taken place.

We have invited a group of photographers, whose work have contributed to the ongoing documentation, with photographs that unearth stories away from the frontlines, such as the displaced within the country and events at the borders. Carolina Rapezzi , one of the guest photographers, explains: according to the latest IOM report (17 April 2022) there are 7,707,000 Internally displaced people in Ukraine. 2,850,000 of this are in West Ukraine. Chernivtsi, the last Ukrainian city before the Romanian border, has become a refuge for roughly over 100,000 displaced Ukrainians, 33,341 are children and 82,340 are now officially registered with IDP status. These are stories I found between Chernivtsi and Siret, the first Romanian city after the Ukrainian border, that has instead become a crossroads, for the ones leaving the country.

We are incredibly honoured to present to you all our guests photographers Carolina Rapezzi, Hether Ng and Natalia Campos who have been covering the war in Ukraine and will be sharing their powerful photography, insights and stories from within the war ravaged country.

Carolina Rapezzi is an Italian freelance photographer based in London who works on social, humanitarian and environmental issues. She started working on migration issues in 2015, documenting the welcoming systems for minors arriving from Libya on the Sicilian coasts (“Minors on the Move” September 2015) and, after a few months, began a project that lasted eight months covering the eviction of the refugee camp of Calais, France (“The Eviction” March-October 2016). Moved to London in 2013, she photographs various protest movements, including those on the Brexit Referendum and the more recent Black Lives Matter. In 2017 she begins a long-term project on identity and gender (“It was meant to be” April 2017 – 2020).In since 2018 and 2019 she started working on environmental issues with a focus on electronic waste and disposal systems (“Burning Dreams” October 2018 – November 2019). In May 2020 she covered the Covid19 pandemic in London, documenting from a homeless hostel and since 2019 she has been working on a project on knife crime and its social roots in London.

Yuen Ching (Hesther) Ng, a London-based Hong Kong photographer who was born in 1992. Currently, she is studying to be a photojournalist from the University of the Arts London (UAL). Her press works are mainly focusing on breaking news and protests. They can be found in various national and international media outlets such as The Guardian, Forbes, BBC, The Times, Metro, and Yahoo! News, CNN, the Wall Street Journal etc. Being born and raised in different countries, she develops a keen interest in documenting the displacement of people and cultures around the world through her lenses. Apart from photography, she is a qualified clinical pharmacist practising in London and an independent journalist from HK Feature.

Natalia Campos is a self-taught freelance photographer originally from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil but based for the past six years in Dublin, Ireland. In her three years as a photographer she has documented protests, news events, and everyday life in countries such as Northern Ireland, Portugal, Turkey, and Georgia. She has recently reported on the humanitarian crisis in Ukraine as a result of the Russian invasion. She is interested in social and political concerns and has collaborated with non-governmental organizations that promote minority rights, equality, and human rights.

Photos from left to right: ©Carolina Rapezzi, ©Yuen Ching (Hesther) Ng, ©Natalia Campos.

About me, and my community

Photography and Storytelling project ‘About Me, and My Community’ for senior residents (60+) living in London Hammersmith and Fulham.

Nubian Life Resource Centre Ltd
50 Ellerslie Road
London
W12 7BW

1st session is on the 27th June 2022 at 01:30 pm, and every Monday thereafter. To register to this free course: HERE

We invite senior residents (60+) living in London borough of Hammersmith and Fulham to take part in a Photography and Storytelling project ‘About me, and my community’.

‘About me, and my community’ is a photography and storytelling project that will provide participants with an encompassing space in which to make new friends and learn the art of Photography and Storytelling.

Participants will be working together taking photos in and around the local communities, and gradually will be exploring and developing their own ideas into photo stories.

During the project, participants will receive guidance and support in tapping into creative processes and will be encouraged to explore places of interest, nurture connections and people; sources of inspiration. Every month, they will have the great opportunity to showcase their work and ideas in a digital zine and at the end of the six month project, they will have the amazing opportunity to be part of a Photography Exhibition.

‘About me, and my community’ is a 6 months project with weekly workshops starting on the 27th June 2022.

During the course of the six months, our weekly meetings will take place at the Nubian Resource Centre, who have offered their lovely space to run the workshops, there will be visits from guest photographers, and related activities such as photography walks, group photography assignments. We will provide equipment for those that do not have a camera or camera phone.

About me, and my community image
©Clare Morris

The project ‘About me, and my community’ is kindly supported by Hammersmith and Fulham Borough, Sobus and NHS Trust.

What is it like to be a young person today

Evaluation Report

Young people photography exhibition

We worked with a group of youths living in White City and Wormholt to talk about their experiences of growing up in the area. We met once a week from January to March and we used photography as a means to represent their lives. Initially the group learned the basics of photography and once they had confidence in using the medium they slowly moved onto working in pairs. They directed their photography, finding their ideal environmental settings, to take photos of each other. As time went on, they started to incorporate in the sessions, their personal experiences. These were coupled with intermittent sessions where all the group engaged in discussions.
We did not input the subject matter, we just facilitated the conversations. We took audio recordings and photos of what they shared as being relevant to their lives.

One of the emerging worry for young people was fear of the future, anxiety which was greatly impacted by Covid-19 pandemic and the drastic changes that it brought to their lives. Loneliness and confusion were also established somewhat by fear of catching covid and the transition from lockdowns to moving back to ‘normal’. One of the participants, expressed very beautifully:

sharing thoughts

Photographically the group worked on expressing what was like to be a young person today, producing great set of photo stories, which they document, their lives through friends, their state of mind, self portraits and photo story on one of the participant.

Following a visual narrative, one of the participants took photos to describe the subject inner life.

Self expression was the method used by this participant, producing a stunning set of landscape photograph that would show their inner mind.

Developed using darktable 3.6.0

The experience of being a young refugee is shown in a beautiful set of photographs. The participants expresses her fears, longing to see their family and hopes for the future.

The teenage world is brought to life by this great set of images captured with a mobile phone. The images document her life through her friends, social life and being together. These photos are wonderfully candid.

The project culminated in a photography showcase part of a Youth Arts Showcase on the 2nd of April at Our Lady of Fatima Hall in White City. The event was a great occasion for the participants to show their work in a public context. The event was attended by many people and was punctuated by presentations and arts workshops. Beneficiaries received a Certificate to award them for their work and participation. They are also officially part of youth arts development team.
Beneficiaries were asked to feedback on the project, at the start of the project, mid way and at the end. We measured:

Improved confidence
Improved wellbeing
Learned new skills
Improved further education, cv, prospects

We are continuing to work with the participants by inviting them to have their say and be part of future arts developments in White City and Wormholt. The project was kindly supported by W12together, who where also the organisers of the Arts Showcase.


PHOTOGRAPHY: DISPLACEMENT BY WAR

21st April 2022 7pm

Frontline Club
13 Norfolk Place
London W2 1QJ
To join: HERE

Presenting photographers, who will share their powerful photography, insights and experiences of documenting wars and displacement.

The consequences and legacy of wartime persecution and displacement are reflected in the work of photojournalists and documentary photographers, who have played a pivotal role in exposing, be of a testimony and witness of these ordeals. Displacement has always been hand in hand with war and conflict, as people flee for safety and security. Photographers have recorded not only the physical displacement but also have conferred through their stories and photographs the extent of emotional, psychological trauma that these experiences cause. An extent that goes over time and sometimes will never heal. In recent years up to today, as we are witnessing one of the largest exodus of people forced to leave their homes in Ukraine, the scale of population displacement by war has been an incredibly stark reality. The reverberations are immense with thousands whose lives are in limbo, experiencing the impact of trauma and loss.

We have invited a group of photographers, whose work and courage have closely documented these realities. Their accounts and photos have contributed to important documentation as well as vital historical and accountability documentation.

We are incredibly honoured to present to you all our guests photographers George Nickels, Quintina Valero, Ed Ram and Ines Gil, who will share their powerful photography, insights and experiences on war displacement.

Ed Ram is a photojournalist and reporter with an interest in conflict, security, and climate change. He has been based in East Africa for for nearly three years, reporting from countries including Kenya, Mozambique, DRC, Sudan, Somaliland and Uganda. Ed works on personal photography projects and for European and US news organisations including newspapers, photo agencies and broadcasters. Most recently, he has been covering the conflict in Ukraine for the Guardian and PBS Newshour. Before working freelance, Ed spent 8 years working as a filmmaker, journalist and senior producer for BBC News.

George Nickels is a freelance photojournalist and has been working in South East Asia and Europe since 2011. The primary focus of his work is covering social conflict and humanitarian issues. Currently based in the United Kingdom, he is a member of The Frontline Freelance Register. Born in Oxfordshire, England in 1982, he is a self-taught photographer, with work published in leading newspapers, magazines and media outlets worldwide.

Ines Gil is a French freelance journalist currently based in Lebanon, after having worked in Israel and the Palestinian territories for two years (Feb. 2018 to Apr. 2020). In August 2017, she travelled to Mosul to cover the developments in Iraq in the aftermath of the war against the so-called Islamic State. More recently, she covered the Beirut port explosion (August 2020) and the war over Nagorno-Karabakh (October 2020). She covered the situation in Afghanistan after the Taliban took power (November-December 2021). She has covered the war in Ukraine since the start of the Russian invasion. Writer and passionate about photography, she works on several media supports. 

Quintina Valero is a Spanish freelance press and documentary photographer. Quintina moved to London in 2001 where she studied photojournalism at the University of the Arts and has since worked for London newspapers as The Archant Group, South London Press, Ham & High, Hackney Gazette, and as a stringer at Getty Images, and lately for the night digital editions of the Telegraph Media Group. Her long-term projects focus on documenting the lives of people affected by conflict, violence and poverty pursuing stories about human rights and social issues. Her work about migration, sex trafficking and the impact of Chernobyl’s nuclear accident have received international awards and featured in The Guardian, Sunday Times, Thomson Reuter Foundation, Stern Magazine, Internationale, BBC, and El País among others. She has exhibited in the UK, Spain, Ukraine, Germany, Italy, Peru, Colombia and Brazil. She is passionate about cultural exchange collaborating often with international artists to produce art and educational projects. In June 2021, The History Press published her book “London’s Record Shops” in collaboration with writer Garth Cartwright.

Valentina Sinis is a documentary photographer and the moderator of the event. She is based in China and the Middle East. Valentina’s projects gravitate toward the quirky and unusual, and portray offbeat realities and people on the margins, they show a deep bond with he subjects. Her photos are a thorough but delicate insight into idiosyncrasies, hidden meanings, and all those little gestures that are either taken for granted or sensationalized — but rarely investigated. Fluent in Chinese , she started by working for European Pressphoto Agency, EPA, in China. Her pictures have been published in major newspapers and magazines worldwide; TIME, The Guardian, La Repubblica, among others. Her works have been exhibited in Europe and China. Among the recognitions and awards, Valentina was selected as one of the 6X6 Europe Talents, by World Press Photo, 2019. The following year, Valentina was the winner of Female in Focus 2020 by British Journal of Photography and she was recognised with the Award of Excellence for Issue Reporting Picture Story in POY 2021. https://www.valentinasinis.com

This event is co-organised with Frontline Club and hosted at Frontline Club in Paddington.

Human Rights in Frame (Turkey)

“Human rights in Frame (Turkey)” is an event focusing on the role of photography in the representation of Human Rights in Turkey.
12th April 2022 18:30 – 20:30 (UK time) Online
to join Here

Human rights in Frame (Turkey) is an event focusing on the role of the image on the representation of Human Rights in Turkey through the work of photographers and NGOs.

In a time when civil rights are being challenged every day, photojournalism and documentary photography is continuing to be of vital importance in exposing these realities. Human rights crisis predominantly affects marginalised groups who experience continuous devaluation and stigmatisation while others are pushed into invisibility. Photography is a method to provide visibility and a voice to those people and to issues; through the work presented in this event, Photojournalism Hub will explore how the visual media has provided valuable tools to raise awareness of human right violations in Turkey. The presentations will be followed by Q&A and conversations on the topics raised, alongside exploring ways on how to get involved. Panel will include a list of great photographers whose works and projects offer an insight on the current situation of human rights in Turkey: Özge Sebzeci, Bradley Secker, Carola Cappellari, Noemi Zaltron.

Özge Sebzeci is a photographer and a journalist based in Istanbul, Turkey. She studied international relations at Galatasaray University where she decided to approach major stories from a human rights perspective. She aims to explore underreported stories, focusing on gender and migration with an intimate approach.Her photography caught the eye of the Magnum Foundation, which awarded her a fellowship. She is a 2021-2022 National Geographic Explorer.

Bradley Secker is a British freelance photojournalist, based in Istanbul, Turkey. His personal work often focuses on themes of identity, migration, social and political actions, and the ramifications of those for individuals. He regularly covers stories about how identity shapes lives in challenging and unexpected ways, particularly within sexual and ethnic minority groups.

Carola Cappellari is an editorial and documentary photographer currently based in Gaziantep, Turkey. Her work alternates autobiographical and documentary approaches to explore themes of womanhood, mental health, family dynamics and migration. With a background in education, Carola believes in the use of participatory creative practices as tools to engage communities and promote intercultural dialogue and, in the past year, she has organised photography and storytelling workshops in collaboration with NGOs based in Southeastern Turkey, involving women and children from refugee communities. She is currently studying for a Master in Human Rights, Migration and Intercultural Inclusion at the University of Bologna

Noemi Zaltron is a documentary photographer who works with images and videos to explore emotional experiences, with the aim to make internal feelings visual. She is particularly interested in the study of issues related to belonging, love and self-consciousness in the context of political and cultural geography and subcultures. She often combine photography with social projects that help to raise awareness and give a voice to unknown stories; in 2021 she collaborated with the NGO Sitoded in Erzurum (North East Turkey) in running a photography course that involved young local adults to learn photography and documentary practice, and to develop a personal photography project about human rights in Turkey.

The event is organised by Noemi Zaltron, who will also be leading the moderation of the event.

FROM THE INSIDE

Photojournalism Hub welcomes three photographers whose work addresses disabilities and stigmas – of their own or of the others .

28th February 2022 18:30 – 21:00

The Invention Rooms, Imperial College
68 Wood Lane
London
W12 7TA

To join: HERE

©Patricia Lay-Dorsey

Living with one or more chronic conditions is the daily routine of so many people in the world. Nonetheless, the way visible and invisible illnesses are portrayed by media, films, and schoolbooks can be highly frustrating. “The disabled” tend to be portrayed as dependent persons who constantly need help. When they are not, they tend to suddenly become heroes, simply for facing their daily lives. Both views point out that the invisible barrier of unconscious stereotypes and bias on the others’ daily truth is the biggest hurdle for a disabled person. For this reasons, Photojournalism Hub welcomes three photographers whose work addresses disabilities and stigmas – of their own or of the others – in differently unique ways: Patricia Lay-DorseyJameisha Prescod and Sophie Harris Taylor.

©Sophie Harris-Taylor
©Jameisha Prescod

This event will be hosted by Sabrina Merolla. She is a documentary and press photographer, multimedia storyteller and participatory photography facilitator, who has shown her daily routine of “diverse ability” in more than one personal project. www.sabrinamerolla.co.uk

Photojournalism Nights, 19th edition – Summary

by Cinzia D’Ambrosi

 ©DiegoRadames

For the 20th edition of the Photojournalism Nights, we welcomed Diego Radames, Godelive Kasangati and Nic Madge, who joined us online from different parts of the world.

The Photojournalism Nights is an event that engages the audience to committed and courageous photojournalism and fosters awareness and debate on human rights and social justice. Whether in Congo, Spain or the UK, the stories presented by the three guest photographers had a common thread that united them: it addresses social inequalities and the disproportionate impact that Covid-19 has had to those in low income and/or ethnic minorities.

Diego Radames, Guatemalan photojournalist based in Madrid, Spain, shared a series of photographs on the migrant communities and the impact of Covid-19 on their lives. Fighting forced evictions, unemployment and lack of opportunities, migrant communities face a lot of challenges. The pandemic situation has only made their grave conditions worse and in desperation, they took to the street of Madrid on a series of demonstrations. Diego has covered these events as news, but then developed he wanted the stories to be heard. So, he began to document the situation of the migrant communities of South America in Spain and in particular looking at the young people lives. In his presentation, Diego explained how young migrants find comfort in belonging to a group sharing similar backgrounds. They seem to meet and be together, but also try to push boundaries, entertaining a hide and seek type of game towards law and order. This quest of integration and acceptance is something that Diego would like to further explore.

DRC, Kinshsa, Notre-Dame de Lemba Catholic Church, the main hallway of the church. ©Godelive Kasangati

Godelive Kasangati, is a photographer from DC Congo, however she joined us from Ghana during the event. She shared her project ‘Almost Empty’ which she worked on whilst in Congo during the Covid-19 lockdown in the country. Godelive found the lack of people in the street and in particular in places where they would have congregated, a powerful experience. In particular, she thought of religious spaces where so much of the community life goes around, being empty. She reflected on the impact of this, in the loneliness that was creating. “In a religious country like Congo, Catholic churches function like a fabric to the society – Godelive says. And to understand and to come to terms to this, Godelive decided to go out during the lockdown and document the empty spaces, the silence, the void.

 ©Godelive Kasangati

NIc Madge is a British photographer, who joined the event from St Albans. Nic talked about his project ‘Pandemic Portraits’, which is a series of photographic portraits presented as diptych; each photograph shows a person with and without their facemask with a caption underneath about how the pandemic has affected them. Throughout 2020-21, Nic has been recording the way in which we are surviving the pandemic by making portraits of people as they go about their daily lives in the city of St Albans in the UK. The extraordinary timeless set of photographs were history in the making – are history- as we look back to reflect, learn, observe how the pandemic has changed our social, political, economic fabric of our society.

Written by Cinzia D’Ambrosi, photojournalist and documentary photographer, founder/director Photojournalism Hub.





YOUTH ARTS SHOWCASE

We are happy to invite you to a Youth Arts Showcase and Exhibition on the 2nd April at Our Lady of Fatima Hall, White City, London.
Photojournalism Hub has engaged local young people with photography to tell the story of what it is like to grow up today in west London, which will be presented in a Photography Exhibition during the Youth Arts Showcase.
The event supported by W12Together will also see the presentations of other local organisations: Urban Flyers (live music and film), Enne (Art and Poetry), Girls create a vibe (Arts and Crafts). All are welcome.

Photojournalism Nights 20th edition

Photojournalism Hub twentieth edition of the Photojournalism Nights presents a superb line-up of guest photographers: Carol Allen StoreyChristopher Bethell Kevin Percival 

Hotel Elephant
1-5 Spare Street

London
SE17 3EP

17th February 2022 06:30 pm till late

To learn more and to join us follow this link here.

Elizabeth provides some physical comfort to her sonAmon by gently bathing him in the shade of banana trees.His body withered from the AIDS virus. Kamughobe , Uganda Carol Allen Storey
©Chris Bethell

Grace outside her home on Wornington Green, the estate where she has lived since she was 28. Made as part of the Wornington Word project, which documents the story of a housing estate in the midst of regeneration, through photography and oral history. ©Kevin Percival