PHOTOJOURNALISM NIGHTS

21st September 2022 18:00-20:30
The Invention Rooms, Imperial College
Door C, 68 Wood Lane
London
W12 7TA

To Join: HERE (in person) or HERE (online)

Photojournalism Hub presents Encarni Pindado , Jakob Dall and James Hopkirk whose work bring to the attention underreported stories of our times.

Encarni Pindado is an award-winning photojournalist and documentary photographer from Spain. Educated in Spain and London. Her work focuses on social and Human rights issues, particularly on violence, migration, and gender. She publishes in some of the most prestigious media outlets in the English and Spanish-speaking world. Such as The Guardian, BBC, The Sunday Times, Al Jazeera, NPR, Reuters, AP, El País, Univision, EFE, among many others. She also collaborates with international institutions such as the UN, ICRC, Amnesty International, UNHCR, OXFAM among many others.Encarni has a long-term project about Mesoamerican women’s migration, focusing on violence (structural, explicit, and symbolic) as a migratory experience from Central America, in transit through Mexico, to the US. She is currently finishing an MSc in Migration, Mobility and Development at SOAS University. Encarni has won several journalism scholarships and awards including, COVID19 Emergency Found from National Geographic, IWMF “underreported story grant”, Pulitzer (producer team); Peabody Award, Finalist W. Eugene Smith Humanitarian Photography Award with her work “The other side of migration: Central American women”. Her work has been exhibited in different galleries and universities across Mexico, US, and the United Kingdom, and she gives conferences and seminars on migration and photojournalism.

Jakob Dall is a freelance photojournalist with a degree from the Danish School of Journalism. He is based in Copenhagen and works as a photojournalist for several daily newspapers like New York Times, magazines, companies and organizations like Copenhagen University, The Danish Parliamentary Ombudsman’s office and with HRH Crown Prince of the Denmark, he has traveled to Mozambique, Nepal and Bangladesh to document the international work of Red Cross. He has also worked as photo editor and photographer at newspaper Berlingske Tidende and Dagbladet Information in Denmark. Jakob Dall ́s photo stories mainly focus on how individuals are affected by events which often receive little media coverage. Through his photos of people from areas of conflict, disaster and crisis he wishes to show the faces and the realities of life in areas that need attention and help from the international community. In parallel with his frequent assignments for different NGO ́s, Red Cross, Danish Church Aid, CARE, Action Aid …, Jakob is working on a personal long-term project called “Climate Change Documentary”, which illustrates the impact climate change has on living conditions and daily life for people around the world. Jakob Dall has won awards from World Press Photo, Picture of the Year International (POYi), Picture of the year Denmark and an international EISA award for his photo essay about climate change impacts in Ethiopia. He has also received the photographers “Fogtdals Grant” for his specific work with climate change impacts.

James Hopkirk has been working as a writer and photographer for over 20 years. In 2015 he launched the South London Stories project, documenting underreported aspects of life in his community. Working collaboratively with Lambeth residents, often over many months or years, he uses photography, text, film, exhibitions and workshops to explore complex social issues, including immigration, homelessness, food poverty, addiction, mental health and the benefits system. www.southlondonstories.com

Photo Above ©Jakob Dall

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What is it like to be a young person today

Evaluation Report

Young people photography exhibition

We worked with a group of youths living in White City and Wormholt to talk about their experiences of growing up in the area. We met once a week from January to March and we used photography as a means to represent their lives. Initially the group learned the basics of photography and once they had confidence in using the medium they slowly moved onto working in pairs. They directed their photography, finding their ideal environmental settings, to take photos of each other. As time went on, they started to incorporate in the sessions, their personal experiences. These were coupled with intermittent sessions where all the group engaged in discussions.
We did not input the subject matter, we just facilitated the conversations. We took audio recordings and photos of what they shared as being relevant to their lives.

One of the emerging worry for young people was fear of the future, anxiety which was greatly impacted by Covid-19 pandemic and the drastic changes that it brought to their lives. Loneliness and confusion were also established somewhat by fear of catching covid and the transition from lockdowns to moving back to ‘normal’. One of the participants, expressed very beautifully:

sharing thoughts

Photographically the group worked on expressing what was like to be a young person today, producing great set of photo stories, which they document, their lives through friends, their state of mind, self portraits and photo story on one of the participant.

Following a visual narrative, one of the participants took photos to describe the subject inner life.

Self expression was the method used by this participant, producing a stunning set of landscape photograph that would show their inner mind.

Developed using darktable 3.6.0

The experience of being a young refugee is shown in a beautiful set of photographs. The participants expresses her fears, longing to see their family and hopes for the future.

The teenage world is brought to life by this great set of images captured with a mobile phone. The images document her life through her friends, social life and being together. These photos are wonderfully candid.

The project culminated in a photography showcase part of a Youth Arts Showcase on the 2nd of April at Our Lady of Fatima Hall in White City. The event was a great occasion for the participants to show their work in a public context. The event was attended by many people and was punctuated by presentations and arts workshops. Beneficiaries received a Certificate to award them for their work and participation. They are also officially part of youth arts development team.
Beneficiaries were asked to feedback on the project, at the start of the project, mid way and at the end. We measured:

Improved confidence
Improved wellbeing
Learned new skills
Improved further education, cv, prospects

We are continuing to work with the participants by inviting them to have their say and be part of future arts developments in White City and Wormholt. The project was kindly supported by W12together, who where also the organisers of the Arts Showcase.


What is like to be a young person today?

What is it like to be a young person? is a photography exhibition part of a Youth Arts Showcase presenting creative work by youths living in White City and Wormholt, London.

The poignant and inspiring photography produced reflect the state of being of young people following the experiences of upheaval, loss, and insecurity poised by Covid-19 pandemic and the extended lockdowns to contain the spread of the virus. Finding metaphors in water, leaves and reflective materials in nature, the young photographers have taken to landscape photography, to their peers, and to the documentation of their friends’ lives as a means of presenting their own lives.

The project was supported by the charity W12together.org and run by the Photojournalismhub.org