Photojournalism Hub in Conversation with Danny Burrows

On Sunday the 7th of August, Safeena Chaudhry from the Photojournalism Hub was in conversation with multi awarded photographer and journalist Danny Burrows.

Danny was the editor in chief of the pan-European magazine Onboard until 2013, when he left to dedicate himself to his freelance photography and writing work. In 2015, Danny began a long-term project documenting the refugee crisis in Northern France, entitled ‘Indeterminate State’. The project received wide recognition with photographs published in The Guardian, The Express, Huck Magazine, Mpora.com and prints were exhibited at Wells Arts Contemporary Exhibition.

Since August 2018 Danny has been shooting a long-term project entitled TOGETHER (A)PART, which documents the pacifist Anabaptist Christian community of The Bruderhof that practices a unique community of goods and wealth and devotion to god in 23 cloistered communities around the world. TOGETHER (A)PART has been well received both inside and beyond the photographic community, with a long form photo essay published in the Sunday Times Magazine in August 2019; an image was selected for the 2018 YICCA Contemporary Arts Exhibition, in Palermo, where it won a silver medal; A photograph was selected for the KLP International Portrait Prize and exhibited world wide; The project received a Coups de Coeur de L’ANI at the 2019 Visa Pour L’Image and was a finalist at the 2019 Prix Regnier Award in Paris.

Danny is currently seeking support to realise a book of the project TOGETHER (A)PART, which with unprecedented access, he is sharing touching photographs that documents the lives of the Bruderhof communities. Having the book published would offer inspiration for alternative ways of living in our world of perpetual war, hyper-consumerism and mass consumption as well as finding a more valued connection with each other as well as very valued historical testimony of this very reserved religious community.

If you would like to support this extraordinary unique document that describes the realms of ‘another life’ – their rejection of personal property, wealth and technologies, a commitment to god and non-violence – then please share this extraordinary story, and help to make this book a reality HERE

Kickstarter link: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/gblimitededitions/together-apart-a-photo-book-by-danny-burrows?ref=ksr_email_creator_launch

To contact Danny Burrows directly:

https://www.instagram.com/dannyburrowsphoto/

https://www.dannyburrowsphotography.com/

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Photojournalism Hub in Conversation with Ada Trillo & Isaac Scott

On Tuesday 2nd August, Cinzia D’Ambrosi and Safeena Chaudhry from Photojournalism Hub were in conversation with Ada Trillo & Isaac Scott about their current exhibition ‘I Look At The World’, which is curated by David Acosta and is being shown at the Da Vinci Art Alliance in Philadelphia.

Ada Trillo is a Philadelphia-based photographer. Born and raised in the U.S/ Mexican border region of Juarez and El Paso, her work focuses on sex trafficking, climate and violence-related international migration, and long-standing barriers of race and class. Her projects have been featured in international publications including The Guardian, Vogue, Smithsonian Magazine, and Mother Jones. Trillo’s work is held in the Library of Congress, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and other institutional and private collections. Her many awards include a First Place in the Tokyo International Foto Awards (2019), a British Journal of Photography Female In Focus Best Series Award and The Me & Eve Grant from the Center of Photographic Arts in Santa Fe (2020). Trillo’s images have been exhibited in the US, Japan, Luxembourg, Italy, England, France, and Germany. She holds degrees from the Istituto Marangoni in Milan, and Drexel University in Philadelphia. Website: https://adatrillo.com

Isaac Scott is a ceramic artist, curator, and photographer from Madison, Wisconsin, who is currently living in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Scott is an MFA candidate at Tyler School of Art and Architecture and plans to graduate in Fall of 2021. His ceramic work has been exhibited around the country including at The Clay Studio in Philadelphia and at the 2019 National Conference for Education in the Ceramic Arts in Minneapolis. Scott’s photographs of the 2020 Uprising in Philadelphia were featured in the June 22, 2020 issue of The New Yorker. In August of 2020 Scott completed his first mural alongside collaborators Gerald A. Brown and Roberto Lugo. The Stay Golden mural is located at 33rd and West Diamond St. in Philadelphia. Just as Scott elevates his subjects on the surface of his pottery, his photography pays tribute to the people and places in his environment. His work capturing the 2020 Uprising follows the protesters and organizers in Philadelphia and the movement for Black Lives. He captures the humanity of those involved and the brutality they face in the streets. Scott’s goal is to capture the voices and stories of the movement for Black Lives Matter and amplify them past this moment so they can speak to generations to come. Website: https://studiopotter.org

Exhibition ‘A Look At The World’ runs: July 27th – August 17th
Opening Reception: July 28th, 4-7pm at Da Vinci Art Alliance (704 Catharine St)

BECOME A PJH MEMBER 
Consider becoming a member of the Photojournalism Hub and receive the benefits of free access to events, Photojournalism Hub resources, editorial content, portfolio reviews and photography exhibitions, and lots more! whilst supporting our work advocating, advancing social justice and human rights through promoting, engaging the public and stakeholders to committed, courageous independent photojournalism, and journalism. If there were ever a time to join us, it is now. Support the Photojournalism Hub from as little as £1 every month. If you can, please consider supporting us with a regular amount each month. Thank you.  JOIN US HERE

Photojournalism Hub in Conversation with Finbarr O’Reilly

Finbarr O’Reilly is a multi award winning photojournalist and the 11th Laureate of the Carmignac Photojournalism Award. He has covered conflicts and combat situations in Congo, Chad, Sudan, Afghanistan, Libya and Gaza. His awards include the 2019 Nobel Peace Prize exhibition photographer and the World Press Photo of The Year in 2020.

‘Congo, A Sublime Struggle’ is evocatively titled after a quote from Patrice Lumumba’s Independence Speech. It is a sequel of ‘Congo in Conversation’ by Congolese photographers and journalists, and produced by the Carmignac Photojournalism Award team and Finbarr.

The monograph explores the Eastern DRC and how it connects with the environmental and climate crisis, the country’s colonial history, and on-going extractive practices. in collaboration with the International Criminal Court.

Iga Barriere, Ituri, DRC, May 17, 2021. Miners at a gold mine in Iga Barriere in Congo’s Ituri province
© Finbarr O’Reilly for Fondation Carmignac

This monograph is a striking and meaningful endeavour that documents and presents the many facets that are part of Congo today, including struggles and efforts in bringing the country as a whole. It includes work on the reparation programme with victims of violence in collaboration with the International Criminal Court.

On Friday 1st July, Finbarr O’Reilly joined Cinzia D’Ambrosi and Safeena Chaudhry in a conversation about The Congo, Photography, reparation and trauma.

During the interview, Finbarr answers questions on his latest work and monograph ‘Congo, A Sublime Struggle’, which contains powerful photographs and writings on Congo of the last two years.

MONOGRAPH – FINBARR O’REILLY
CONGO, A SUBLIME STRUGGLE

Carmignac Photojournalism Award – 11th Edition
Democratic Republic of Congo

Co-published by: Reliefs / Fondation Carmignac
Release date: June 17, 2022
Bilingual: French/English
Size: 24 × 28 cm, 128 pages
Texts : Finbarr O’Reilly, Comfort Ero and Judge Antoine Kesia-Mbe Mindua
Photographs : Finbarr O’Reilly
Price: 35 euros, 45 USD, 58 CAD, 35 GBP
Distributed by: Harmonia Mundi

BECOME A PJH MEMBER 
Consider becoming a member of the Photojournalism Hub and receive the benefits of free access to events, Photojournalism Hub resources, editorial content, portfolio reviews and photography exhibitions, and lots more! whilst supporting our work advocating, advancing social justice and human rights through promoting, engaging the public and stakeholders to committed, courageous independent photojournalism, and journalism. If there were ever a time to join us, it is now. Support the Photojournalism Hub from as little as £1 every month. If you can, please consider supporting us with a regular amount each month. Thank you.  JOIN US HERE

Poland’s Abortion Ban Protests, Interview with Zula Rabikowska

By Laura James

On 22 October 2020, the Constitutional Tribunal in Poland ruled that abortion on the grounds of fetal abnormality was unconstitutional, further restricting Poland’s already stringent abortion laws (Thebmjopinion). This abortion ban caused outrage among Polish people and resulted in mass protests in the streets. Zula Rabikowska, a Polish-British documentary photographer and videographer, currently based in Karków, attended these protests as they unfolded in order to document the events but also to stand in solidarity with Polish women and help secure the basic human right of safe abortion healthcare. 

In what follows, Zula talks about the current situation regarding the abortion ban, shares her lived experiences of the protests and explains how the Polish people are fighting for their human rights, freedom of speech and going against the tyrannical government currently in power.

What was your motivation for documenting the protests? 

That’s an interesting question. I think it was multi-layered to be honest. I felt a sense of responsibility on a personal level as a female identifying individual who is Polish. Having recently moved back to Poland after living in the UK for 20 years I almost felt like this is something I have to do to show solidarity with other women in Poland, but also for myself and for my own rights to abortion health care. I believe it is a fundamental human right that unfortunately the Polish government does not share. 

So, that was the first layer of my motivation. The second element was that I wanted to be there as a documentary photographer and I was really frustrated to see just how many male photographers were present but there was only 1 or 2 women (In Kraków). From my general understanding, and from having had conversations with other photographers who have covered other areas in Poland, there was a general consensus that this is something that is being covered by male photojournalists. I felt a double sense of frustration as a participant and also as a photographer as I felt like female photographers should have been given more of a voice in this and get their perspectives heard and seen.

What was the atmosphere like at the protests? 

In the winter months it was relentless, it was all the time. It wasn’t just protests which were happening, there were pickets, road closures, transport strikes. The tension in the atmosphere was really tangible, you could see in the streets and you could feel it just walking around. The protests have a symbol of the red thunderbolt and you would see this in bakeries for example, people would have the red thunderbolt in their car windows, on their jackets, on their phones, on their faces, on their masks. It was very much a movement that to this day is still going on. The other day, I was checking out a local a tattoo parlour and there are artists who specialise in the thunderbolt, due to a demand for people to have this tattooed on the body. 

This is something that has really affected the Polish society and it quickly became not just about abortion, it became about the oppression from the very right-wing government here. Some of the protests I was going along to were about pedophilia in the Catholic Church. People just took to the streets to show how fed up they were with the current tyrannical government.  

What was the main message the protesters wanted to convey? 

I think the main message was to show the government, and internationally, that people disagree with this ban. Poland isn’t this homophobic, homogenous, Catholic, conservative country that the government would like everyone to believe. This is the message that appears in the state-owned media in Poland, it is pure propaganda and it’s quite frightening how the message is portrayed. Alongside this, the way they portrayed the protests and protesters in the state news was horrific. It didn’t really show this message of abortion health care and the need for women and for people to have a say about their rights. 

The baseline message was that people wanted to express their discontent for this ban and their need to have safe access to abortion. The second message would be this wave of being fed up and ready for a change of government.

You said that the protests are still happening today, is it in such a large capacity as back in winter? 

Yes and no. Before in Kraków, every other evening there would be thousands of protesters taking to the streets, and I haven’t seen it happening as much right now. But that is not to say that protests on a smaller scale aren’t happening. 

This weekend it was actually 11 years ago that a plane crashed in Poland and 93 right wing politicians died. So, the current president that we have now, his twin brother and mother died in that plane crash. As a result people took to the streets and to the main market square in Kraków to protest against the government, so this kind of discontent is very much present. In addition, on 1st May Poland observed International Labour Day, which is traditionally a day to celebrate labourers and the working classes, and lots of people demonstrated with the thunderbolt symbol on this day. I went along on 18th April to Wawel Castle in Kraków as Jaroslaw Kaczynski, the leader of the Law and Justice party, came to the city. On this day the politicians were greeted by a small crowd of protesters holding up banners and with their faces in red thunderbolts. The way the large-scale protests were happening in January, October and November and even in December have changed, but it doesn’t mean that people aren’t still striking.

Did you feel safe documenting the demonstrations? 

Once again, I was in Kraków, yet in Warsaw a lot of arrests of photojournalists were being made and this completely infringed freedom of speech in my opinion. This did happen in Kraków to an extent but obviously the protests weren’t as big as in Warsaw. Yet, there were a few occasions when I thought to myself should I be here? And that wasn’t because of the protesters, but the main threat came from the police who were kitted out with tear gas and shields, and really looked in full combat mode. When you are surrounded by 50 or 60 police it is really intimidating. But intimidation was definitely one of the tactics that they were going for with that presence. The other threat was that the police used the pandemic and used megaphones with the slogan ‘you shouldn’t be meeting in groups of more than 5 people’. They used this as an excuse to arrest people or fine them.

Within the community do you feel there is a sense of polarisation between supporters of the abortion ban and those who are protesting against it? 

I guess that is happening all around us these days. I could compare it to Brexit in the UK and we are seeing it right now with people being pro-vaccine and anti-vaccine. But I suppose within the liberal bubble that I live in in Kraków, I personally didn’t encounter anyone directly who was anti-abortion. But I have seen the countermovement of the right wing people come out to confront the protesters. I remember there was a group of nuns and priests who came out to the protests with huge speakers to drown out the protesters with religious songs and the police didn’t stop them. This is one of many examples of such actions.

As a Polish woman do you feel your human rights are being violated by this ban? 

Yes definitely 100%. It is a huge violation and is very upsetting that the government and parts of the society do not see it that way. 

Do you think the protests will continue until the ban is lifted? 

I think it is difficult to say to be honest. But this time people have explicitly been taking to the streets. People have been fired by their employers for protesting, so people have been losing their jobs because of this. Nevertheless, people are still willing to protest and to let the government and society know that this is not ok. 

At the same time, I think things will only change when we elect another government as the situation right now is really tyrannical, not just in terms of the abortion ban, but with the lack of freedom of speech, democracy and even the way the state news reports on what is factual and not factual is frightening. 

Will you continue to document the protests via photography? 

Yes definitely. But photography is only one of the tools I use, I also use multimedia and video to make sense of the world around me and if other people are finding it useful to help make sense of the world then great. So I have no intention of stopping at least for the near future. 

Zula Rabikowska
Photographer
www.zulara.co.uk
@Zula.ra

Laura James
Writer
Laura@photojournalismhub.org

All photographs ©Zula Rabikowska

Consider becoming a member of the Photojournalism Hub and receive the benefits of free access to events, PJHub resources, editorial content, annual PJHub photography exhibition and portfolio reviews, and lots more! whilst supporting our work advocating, advancing social justice and human rights using independent photojournalism and documentary photography.  How to join HERE

PODCASTS

ANGELA CHRISTOFILOU

©Angela Christofilou

Jamie Clark, photographer and Photojournalism Hub Associate is in conversation with actress, voice over artist and photographer Angela Christofilou.

In this podcast, Angela shares her photography career and her inspiring path to visual narrative. She describes how she began photographing, how she has found empowerment through photography and how she believes this can be a powerful tool for other women, too.

Angela is also sharing insight into her important and ongoing work covering protests, a body of work that is archive at Bishopsgate Institute.

To see her work: Website Instagram

©Angela Christofilou

ERICA DEZONNE

Mother tied up her daughter – Esso Award Finalist Picture ©Erica Dezonne

In this podcast, freelance photojournalist Erica Dezonne is in conversation with Jamie Clark, our podcaster and photographer. Originally from Brazil and based in London, Erica is sharing her fascinating journey into capturing world events, news and stories through the camera lens. Erica’s career sees her working through the fast and challenging world of news for the RAC Group in Campinas, which is one of the biggest media company in the state of São Paulo in Brazil, all the way to reporting on the street of London. Her photography work has gained recognition in various awards finals, including the prestigious Esso final Award in 2011. Erica’s innate curiosity and passion that transpires in her reporting is splendidly summarized in her own words “with my Finnish heritage I had the bravery and courage to leave my comfort zone in Brazil and face what the world is saving for me.

www.ericadezonne.com IG & Twitter: @ericadezonne #ericadezonne

Prostitutes after police enforcement ©Erica Dezonne

Podcast by photographer, videographer Jamie Clark, jamiephclark@yahoo.co.uk

HANNAH MORNEMENT

In this podcast, photojournalist and documentary photographer Hannah Mornement is interviewed by Jamie Clark about her photographic work The Road to Mote and her journey as a photographer.
Through discussing her long form powerful project The Road to Mote and her personal journey into photojournalism and documentary photography , Hannah shares her working methods and she lets us into the intricacies of working as a photojournalist today. Her passion for humanitarian issues and her years’ long experience of working in challenging environments from Antarctica to Africa has led her to work alongside many international charities and NGO’s documenting complex humanitarian issues. In this podcast, Hannah talks about her photo stories of people relying on food banks in the UK, of children living in orphanages in Eastern Europe, of famine and food security in Africa, as well as discussing her role and the role of photojournalism in documenting social issues today.

www.hannahmornement.com IG & Twitter: #hmornement @teapot_one

Podcast by photographer, videographer Jamie Clark, jamiephclark@yahoo.co.uk