Photojournalism Hub Prints

A collection of social justice and human rights issue driven photographic prints supporting photojournalists and documentary photographers who courageously and truthfully work to effect change.
Every purchase directly supports our photojournalists and documentary photographers.

Maria Tomas Rodriguez


Printed on Hahnemühle Fine Art Paper
From an edition of 20 , numbered and signed on the reverse
Paper size: 16 x 12 inches
Unframed

£300 + p&p
Photojournalism Hub Members £ 270 + p&p

Young girl after school.
Photo taken in Kenya, 2019. In many places, when Christmas holidays are over, girls are back to their homework routines, classes, and perhaps midterm exams.  In some Kenyan villages, girls aged between 9-17 years old returning to school after the Christmas break means that they will be subjected to pregnancy tests and examined for female genital mutilation – FGM – by trained medical professionals in local schools and clinics. The tests have been put in place as many girls are forced to undergo FGM during the Christmas vacation, and pregnancies following it are not uncommon.

Printed on Hahnemühle Fine Art Paper
From an edition of 20 , numbered and signed on the reverse
Paper size: 16 x 12 inches
Unframed

£300 + p&p

Photojournalism Hub Members £ 270 + p&p

Celebration day.
Photo taken in Senegal, 2016. This woman lives in the Ossouye, a small village in the Casamance, Senegal’s south. On this day, new young men circumcisions were taking place and women were out dressed up in their best outfits.

Printed on Hahnemühle Fine Art Paper
From an edition of 20 , numbered and signed on the reverse
Paper size: 16 x 12 inches
Unframed

£300 + p&p

Photojournalism Hub Members £ 270 + p&p

Bedik woman.
Photo taken in Senegal 2016. The Bedik tribe lives in the south-eastern corner of Senegal, near the Guinean border and close to the headwaters of the Gambia River. They arrived at different times between the 11th and 19th centuries. The area remains remote and many of the cultural adaptations of the people, including their agro-pastoral, social, ritual and spiritual practices persist to this day.

Printed on Hahnemühle Fine Art Paper
From an edition of 20 , numbered and signed on the reverse
Paper size: 16 x 12 inches
Unframed

£300 + p&p
Photojournalism Hub Members £270 + p&p

Traditional celebration.
Photo taken in Senegal 2017. Male circumcision is one of the oldest and most widespread surgical procedures in the world performed in pre-pubertal boys, adolescents or adults. In Senegal, male circumcision is considered essential for becoming a full member of society and it is a major festivity across the community with big celebrations for which men wear their traditional outfits.

Printed on Hahnemühle Fine Art Paper
From an edition of 20 , numbered and signed on the reverse
Paper size: 16 x 12 inches
Unframed

£300 + p&p
Photojournalism Hub Members £ 270 + p&p

Boats of shame. Photo taken in Canary islands, Spain, in 2021. In 2020/21, around 45,000 illegal immigrants from West Africa arrived by boat to the Canary Islands (Spain, EU). This route is the deadliest migratory path: 1 out of 20 migrants dies on the attempt to reach European soil. Poorly equipped boats travel distances of up to 1,500 kms. The engines break often, leaving the passengers adrift for days or weeks in which food and water run out. Frequently the occupants die during the crossing. Those who remain alive throw the corpses into the ocean to save on fuel. Ports on the Canary Islands are these days plagued with hundreds of these abandoned boats.

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Maria Tomas Rodriguez
Maria Tomas-Rodriguez is a Spanish born photographer living in UK for the last 22 years. Her photography work has always been black and white social – documentary photography, although recently, with the pandemic and domestic lockdown, she started exploring colour photography. Maria combines her current university academic job with her interest in photography and travelling for documenting social matters and people’s cultures & traditions. She collaborates on regular basis with Baolar, a charity based in Senegal as an active member and photographer. Her major photography work concerns the modern-slavery conditions of children and the harsh working conditions of fishermen, both works in Senegal. She also has documented the Afar salt miners work in Ethiopia just a few months before the war started in the Eritrean border.
Her main interest is to contribute to raise awareness on injustices and social inequalities. Some of her work has been published in UK online magazines and Spanish local newspapers. In parallel to her interest in documentary photography, she is very keen on water sports and has
developed a still ongoing portfolio on wind and water sports, attending major championships and documenting the training of professionals of these sports. Her work has been recognized at several international photography awards and exhibited in the last
years, both individual and group exhibitions.
Instagram @photomtr

Images will be printed by Genesis Imaging.

Mohammed Salim Khan

Printed on Hahnemühle Fine Art Paper
From an edition of 20 , numbered and signed on the reverse
Paper size: 16 x 12 inches
Unframed

£300 + p&p
Photojournalism Hub Members £270 + p&p


Children in the camp don’t have toys to play like most other children outside the refugee camp

Printed on Hahnemühle Fine Art Paper
From an edition of 20 , numbered and signed on the reverse
Paper size: 16 x 12 inches
Unframed

£300 + p&p
Photojournalism Hub Members £270 + p&p

We don’t have any ambulances and during an emergency we need to walk to the nearest primary level hospital, which is very far from the camp.

Printed on Hahnemühle Fine Art Paper
From an edition of 20 , numbered and signed on the reverse
Paper size: 16 x 12 inches
Unframed

£300 + p&p
Photojournalism Hub Members £270 + p&p

Conflagrations are common in the camp. In one of these events a mother was separated from her son in the ensuing chaos. They were reunited a day later.

Printed on Hahnemühle Fine Art Paper
From an edition of 20 , numbered and signed on the reverse
Paper size: 16 x 12 inches
Unframed

£300 + p&p
Photojournalism Hub Members £270 + p&p

Genocide remembrance day.

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Mohammed Salim Khan
Mohammed Salim Khan, I am a 28 years old photographer. My family became refugees and fled from Myanmar in 1991. I grew up in Kutupalong refugee Camp in Bangladesh. I am a person, who has never ever seen his own country and home village. I have been capturing lives and emotions of my community who has been fleeing violence and persecution in Myanmar for decades and now are dispersed in refugee camps.
My photos have been published in several Bangladeshi and international media, including The Guardian, The Independent, ABC news, Reuters, Al Jazeera, NPR, The Washington Post, AFP, South China Morning Post to name a few, as well as been presented in many international exhibitions in Italy, Japan, and the UK, including featured in the Oxford Human Rights Festival, UK

Ségolène Ragu

Printed on Hahnemühle Fine Art Paper
From an edition of 20 , numbered and signed on the reverse
Paper size: 16 x 12 inches
Unframed

£300 + p&p
Photojournalism Hub Members £270 + p&p

Semiramis
Like Beirut itself, the Semiramis building is falling into ruin. Built in the 1960s, it was a luxury building decorated with rich mosaics and statues of lions at the entrance. It used to host rich tourists from the Gulf in furnished flats. Today, the owners no longer want to maintain it. With the soaring devaluation of the Lebanese pound (which has lost 98% of its value in three years), they are now only receiving symbolic rents. They are therefore trying to evict the current tenants in order to resell the building or destroy it.

Printed on Hahnemühle Fine Art Paper
From an edition of 20 , numbered and signed on the reverse
Paper size: 16 x 12 inches
Unframed

£ 300 + p&p
Photojournalism Hub Members £270 + p&p

Like Beirut itself, the Semiramis building is falling into ruin. Built in the 1960s, it was a luxury building decorated with rich mosaics and statues of lions at the entrance. It used to host rich tourists from the Gulf in furnished flats. Today, the owners no longer want to maintain it. With the soaring devaluation of the Lebanese pound (which has lost 98% of its value in three years), they are now only receiving symbolic rents. They are therefore trying to evict the current tenants in order to resell the building or destroy it.

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Semiramis
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Ségolène Ragu is a French-Lebanese photojournalist based between Paris and Beirut. After a professional experience in cultural desk research and audiovisual, she completed a training course in documentary photojournalism at EMI-CFD in Paris. Since then, she has been documenting the consequences of the economic, political, and social crisis in Lebanon through personal projects and assignments.

To purchase a print, please contact Photojournalism Hub, admin@photojournalismhub.org

Images are printed by Genesis Imaging

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