Photojournalism Hub x Riverside Studios 22nd April

22nd April 2024, 7 pm
Riverside Studios
101 Queen Caroline Street
London W6 9BN

To join: HERE

Photojournalism Hub and Riverside Studios are delighted to announce Sascha Klamp and Valeria Luongo as the featured photographers for ‘In Focus,’ a captivating series of photography events. This series present photographers whose work engage with social documentary photo storytelling, using the lens as a powerful tool for engagement, exploration and raising awareness. The event includes presentations, live interactive Q&As and a social.
Our guests of this edition have a background or work with an anthropological approach, using documentary photography to present stories that capture and explore community and individual memory, archives and rituals.

Valeria Luongo is an Italian documentary photographer, filmmaker, and anthropologist who’s based between Mexico and the UK. Her photographic approach is characterised by working on long term projects. Her work explores stories regarding gender, spirituality and rituals and has been featured in National Geographic, The Guardian, BBC, GEO Magazine and exhibited internationally.

“When Women Fly” is a  project about a group of indigenous women from Cuetzalan del Progreso, Mexico, challenging gender roles by participating in a traditionally male ritual called Danza de los Voladores.
The ritual begins with a ceremonial dance. Five participants then ascend a 30-metre pole and jump off the top, head first, tied to ropes as they revolve around the pole towards the ground.
Historically, only men were allowed to partake in the ritual. However, a few women in Cuetzalan have recently joined the practice. The flying women defy traditional gender roles, symbolising transformation within their social context. Since 2022 I’ve been working alongside several women and girls who fly, documenting their everyday lives among their community.

Sascha Klamp is a British/German multi-award winning Documentary Filmmaker, Photo-documentary Journalist and Producer based in London, UK. He spent the majority of his career as an investor and entrepreneur which enabled him to travel across frontier and emerging markets. His photography practice centres on highlighting social impact and social justice affairs which is deeply rooted in his curiosity to learn more of the world around him. He tells frontline human and community stories based on empathy for the situation and the people involved. His thinking is informed by his interest in ethnology and social anthropology. Sascha exhibited a small selection of his The Art of Seeing, The Art of Remembering project in London in November 2022. His work was highly commended by the TPF Social Documentary Awards (Professional Category, Series) for his The Art of Seeing, The Art of Remembering work. Sascha completed his MA Photojournalism & Documentary Photography studies at the University of the Arts (Distinction), London. He also holds an MBA (Bayes Business School, London) and a Masters in Law, LLM (King’s College, London), and a BSc International Securities, Investment & Banking from Henley Business School (ICMA Centre). Filmography: “The Art of Seeing, The Art of Remembering” (2022), “The Blockade” (2023).

In a remote village in Kosovo, the past casts a long shadow. A single family of 2500 souls, now in its 13th generation, struggles to find its place in a changing world. Based on the Directors engagement with the community and renowned Community Archival work, KINSHIP tells the story of one family’s search for belonging.
We meet Rabit, the community’s Doctor, who recounts his heart-breaking tale of being ‘gifted’ to his uncle as a young boy. An all too common practice rooted in ancient customs. He grapples with the trauma of his stolen innocence. Meanwhile, Couple Mumin and Qamile Dermaku tell their moving story of how they met, the challenge he went through gifting a brother to a neighbour and his wife’s struggle to join the ‘jungle’ of a remote community. Expecting mother Florentina faces her own struggle. Pregnant with her first child, she dreams of a better future. But is that future possible here? Or must she also make the painful choice to leave everything she has ever known behind? The village Elders tell their stories aided by black-and-white photographs sourced from their family photo albums. They recount stories of happier times but also times of conflict and change. These memories contradict with the experience of the younger generations who cannot imagine a rural life with its limited resources and opportunities. Joining the diaspora is a potential way out to seek a fortune and future elsewhere. The cleric focuses on holding the community together. But his own story contradicts the ambitions of his community. The state looks away from the Kanun law/ tradition (Kanun of Lek Dukagjini). The honour code (vendetta in Italy) contradicts with the country’s ambition to become a full EU member. We engage with Child Psychologists who explain the harm done to children being gifted to family members and how that trauma informs their choices. Running away from it all sounds like a sound choice for many.

BECOME A PJH MEMBER
Consider becoming a member of the Photojournalism Hub and receive the benefits of free access to events, resources, premier editorial content, portfolio reviews, and discounts on entry to our photography exhibitions, training and in our shop, whilst you will be supporting our work advocating, advancing social justice and human rights, amplifying community voices and enhance access to media to those facing social, economic and structural challenges. If there were ever a time to join us, it is now. Support the Photojournalism Hub from as little as £1 every month. If you can, please consider supporting us with a regular amount each month. Thank you. JOIN US HERE

CAPTURING CRISIS

In this new edition of ‘Capturing Crisis’ youth photography magazine, we present a special edition on a local coffee shop to learn of its championing and success. We present a photo essay on the charity Nourish Hub documenting its cycle of sustainability, healthy and free food for all.
Our young team also reported on Free Palestine local and national responses. And we present evocative images at Meanwhile Gardens, a photo story on volunteers creating a community garden at Factory Quarter in west London.
In the last pages, we present the world of teenagers and friends, and a few portraits from a series of portraits of staff at The Globe, the dedicated Shakespeare Theatre in central London. We hope you enjoy Capturing Crisis youth magazine!

Capturing Crisis is a youth documentary and photojournalism magazine. All features and photographs are created by participants of ‘Stories, Reporting Mag, Photography Course’.
The magazine provides the opportunity for youths who never had access to, to share their photography and photo stories to a large audience. Photojournalism Hub is committed to providing opportunities and support to youths, enabling equality in accessing opportunities for further education and work in the photo industry.
Capturing Crisis magazine is a testament of the great work and inspiring contribution of our youths.

The project is supported by the NHS west London trust, Hammersmith and Fulham Council and Sobus.

National Demonstration Free Palestine

National Demonstration for Free Palestine and a Ceasefire Now in London, 25th November 2023.

At Photojournalism Hub we work for social justice and human rights through publishing, promoting and supporting the work of independent photojournalists and documentary photographers. It is our belief that no one should be killed for their faith, ethnicity, nationality. What we are witnessing every day in the past 7 weeks has hurt us immensely. It is wrong to tackle acts of terrorism by disproportionately or indiscriminately killing and injuring civilians, women and children. We hope for a Ceasefire and for Palestinians right to peace, security and to live in their own independent state, free from occupation. We stand for Peace and an end of war.

Below are some photographs from our team on pro Palestine marches in London.

©Cinzia D’Ambrosi

©Cinzia D’Ambrosi

@Cinzia D’Ambrosi

©Safeena Chaudhry

©Sienna Sunna

Cinzia D’Ambrosi @cinziadambrosi
Safeena Chaudhry  @photographerdreamertraveller

Sienna Sunna

CAPTURING CRISIS

I am incredibly pleased to present the first edition of ‘Capturing Crisis’ photography and reporting magazine produced by our youths group living in west London participating in the ‘Stories, Reporting Mag, Photography Course’ project.
In this first edition of ‘Capturing the Crisis’, we present photo stories and articles on the impact of the cost of living crisis on various communities in London. It includes personal and introspective stories of people living the crisis as well as stories reflecting on the way the city of London is rapidly changing as a result of it. Nonetheless, the photography is particularly captivating as each participant is developing their individual style and line of research. I hope you enjoy this first edition and will follow and support the ‘Capturing Crisis’ magazine.
I am very proud for the commitment, talent and drive demonstrated by the young participants.

Capturing Crisis is a youth documentary and photojournalism magazine. All features and photographs are created by participants of ‘Stories, Reporting Mag, Photography Course’.
The magazine provides the opportunity for youths who never had access to, to share their photography and photo stories to a large audience. Photojournalism Hub is committed to providing opportunities and support to youths, enabling equality in accessing opportunities for further education and work in the photo industry.
Capturing Crisis magazine is a testament of the great work and inspiring contribution of our youths.

The project is supported by the NHS west London trust, Hammersmith and Fulham Council and Sobus.

BECOME A PJH MEMBER
Consider becoming a member of the Photojournalism Hub and receive the benefits of free access to events, Photojournalism Hub resources, premier editorial content, portfolio reviews, photography exhibitions, discounts on our courses and training, whilst you will be supporting our work advocating, advancing social justice and human rights. If there were ever a time to join us, it is now. Support the Photojournalism Hub from as little as £1 every month. If you can, please consider supporting us with a regular amount each month. Thank you. Join usHERE

Injustices & Inequalities: Covid-19 – Edition 12

Covid-19 pandemic has disproportionately affected communities and individuals who are poor, marginalised, discriminated; has brought to light the existing inequalities and injustices and in some cases how the impact has generated wider repercussions.

Through an Open Call, began at the heights of the global pandemic in 2020, Photojournalism Hub has been collecting photo stories, articles and multimedia pieces on the impact of Covid-19 on the most vulnerable, including the poor, BAME communities, refugees, the elderly, women, the stateless, and asylum seekers.

The submitted stories have been published on the Photojournalism Hub website providing an independent visual investigation on governments missed opportunities and on the scale of systemic failings which have caused sufferings and losses.

We would like to present this independent visual investigation in a series of public events, including a photography exhibition to present a body of evidential work that would leverage and provide a platform for a public discourse to enable recommendations and key actions, for improved, cohesive and inclusive protection of the most marginalised, discriminated and disadvantaged and would provide accountable points in order to advance to social justice for all.

NUESTROS +ESENCIALES (OUR +ESSENTIALS)

Photography by Sebastian Ambrossio

This Photographic-Documentary Report came from a personal concern to show, narrate and visually document through photographs the work of health professionals, of the essential workers who work in the hospital in Mercedes, and those connected to the hospital who work to combat the pandemic. The project explores how health workers dealt with this virus, leaving everything to give the best to patients.
Blas L. Dubarry Acute General Zone Hospital, Sanitary Region X – Mercedes, Province of Buenos Aires, Argentina.

©Sebastian Ambrossio
©Sebastian Ambrossio

©Sebastian Ambrossio
©Sebastian Ambrossio
©Sebastian Ambrossio
©Sebastian Ambrossio

Photography and text:
Sebastian Ambrossio
@sebastianambrossio

Music:
Rodrigo Almas
@rodrigo_al_mar


ANTI-LOCKDOWNS IN IRELAND

Photography by

Krzysztof Maniocha

Photographer Krzysztof Maniocha has documented anti-lockdown protests in Dublin, Ireland. Ireland had one of the longest lockdowns and some of the most controversial restrictions in Europe.  His photographs are presenting moments of clashes between police and protesters, as well as uncovering the existing issues externalised by the imposed restrictions: religion, identity and people’s resistance.

©Krzysztof Maniocha
©Krzysztof Maniocha
©Krzysztof Maniocha
©Krzysztof Maniocha
©Krzysztof Maniocha

Photography:
Krzysztof Maniocha
@krzysztofmaniocha

Photo editor: Cinzia D’Ambrosi

FROM THE INSIDE

Photojournalism Hub welcomes three photographers whose work addresses disabilities and stigmas – of their own or of the others .

28th February 2022 18:30 – 21:00

The Invention Rooms, Imperial College
68 Wood Lane
London
W12 7TA

To join: HERE

©Patricia Lay-Dorsey

Living with one or more chronic conditions is the daily routine of so many people in the world. Nonetheless, the way visible and invisible illnesses are portrayed by media, films, and schoolbooks can be highly frustrating. “The disabled” tend to be portrayed as dependent persons who constantly need help. When they are not, they tend to suddenly become heroes, simply for facing their daily lives. Both views point out that the invisible barrier of unconscious stereotypes and bias on the others’ daily truth is the biggest hurdle for a disabled person. For this reasons, Photojournalism Hub welcomes three photographers whose work addresses disabilities and stigmas – of their own or of the others – in differently unique ways: Patricia Lay-DorseyJameisha Prescod and Sophie Harris Taylor.

©Sophie Harris-Taylor
©Jameisha Prescod

This event will be hosted by Sabrina Merolla. She is a documentary and press photographer, multimedia storyteller and participatory photography facilitator, who has shown her daily routine of “diverse ability” in more than one personal project. www.sabrinamerolla.co.uk

INJUSTICES & INEQUALITIES: COVID-19 EDITION 5

As Coronavirus continues to spread throughout the world, it is increasing social injustices and bringing inequalities to the forefront. In this fifth edition, documentary photographer David Gilbert Wright shares the touching photo story of Paul, a homeless man who he became friends with during the current pandemic. This photo story highlights the impact of years of austerity on the most poor and exposes the further impact of the outbreak on them.
The story of Paul speaks of the many which were already at the receiving end of funding cuts and support and they now in a lot worse conditions.
These are issues we need to see, reflect upon and action.

Homeless and Locked Down
Paul’s Story

by David Gilbert Wright

It was springtime, and the weather was beautiful. The skies had been clear for several weeks and the sun had been warming up the earth. But this was no normal spring. England was in the grips of an unknown pandemic and the Government had ordered a lockdown. Everyone but a few, were staying home. Buses and trains were empty, roads were empty and we were all trying to adapt to a new way of living. Rules about when you can go out and for what were in place. The population were being ‘frightened’ into believing that hundreds and thousands would catch this new virus and many would die. I was out walking the dog in nearby woods when I came across a tent pitched deep in a thicket, out of sight. I was intrigued. It took several more days before I plucked up the courage to investigate. That was when I met Paul. He was homeless and living in these woods. He was locked down too! Over the next 3-4 months I got to know Paul and he is the subject of this story.

Paul is 52 years old. He had a brother who died in his forties and a sister. He told me that his Mum left home when he was 15 years old. That was the start of things. “I left home and came to London. London was a terrible place back then and being homeless was very dangerous. I was sleeping rough when some one picked me up and took me along to a kind of hostel. You had to ‘book’ a night and then get out in the morning. I think they felt sorry for me and gave me a job sweeping and cleaning the rooms. That saved me. I lived in a house in Thurrock at some point and had a sort of job. I had to go sick and so I lost that job and couldn’t pay the rent so they evicted me. I have been on the move ever since. I don’t like towns. They are too scary. I decided to get a tent and live out in the country somewhere so here I am”. He got up and started to make a little fire. “Now it is warming up, the midges are starting to get on my nerves so I light a fire and the smoke keeps them away” he said laughing.

Paul often walked up to the town. He had broken his hip some time in the recent past and suffered from terrible sciatica. “I have to take pain-killers” he told me, “so I come up to the chemist every week or two to get me repeat prescription. Trouble is, people try to mug me and take my drugs”. We sat for a while in the warm sun and then this woman came along. Her name was Lizzie. She told me that she was what some call a ‘sofa-surfer’. “That’s someone who is homeless and manages to get a place to sleep in someone’s house.” She was in her 50s and had been homeless since the breakdown of her marriage. She was very guarded but alluded to being badly abused and beaten by her partner until she couldn’t stand it anymore and managed to escape. She had several grown-up children and managed to see them occasionally but she also was living a hard life. She told me how difficult it was in the winter. ‘We both try to find something a bit more permanent if we can because you can freeze at nights’ Paul told me.

We were talking in his encampment in the woods one day and he started to tell me about his Faith. It surprised me somewhat. He rummaged around in his tent, beer can in one hand and pulled out a book. It was the Pilgrim’s Progress by Chaucer. I see myself as a kind of pilgrim, always on the move. I am like the guy in the book, in search of something. It is something I can identify with. He rummaged a bit more and pulled out another book. “This is my Bible”. He said “I pray everyday. I try to speak to God. I think He loves me despite my faults. He loves me unconditionally. He does not expect me to change. I feel he forgives me for all the stuff I have done. He is my rock. Later that morning, we were walking up to the town together and he started reciting the Lord’s Prayer.

I asked Paul what he did for food. He told me that he visited a food bank in Brentwood. He told me where it was and I realised that it must take him nearly an hour to walk to it because he was very slow, due to his arthritis and needing a crutch to help. “They are very good and deliver stuff to me sometimes”. The food bank only opens twice a week between 10 and 12 midday. Paul was not usually an early riser. I often got to his tent mid-morning to find him sound asleep. “Jem looks after me. He will always open up if he is around”. So one afternoon we set off on the walk to the Food Bank. We talked about all kinds of things as we walked. Steve was the priest. He found a whole lot of food and Paul was so pleased with the large tin of assorted biscuits, like you get at Christmas. It was then that I realised first-hand how important these food banks are to people like Paul.

“I used to have another guitar but when I stayed a night with this woman she stole it and sold it for 5. Probably spent the money on drugs. Someone gave me another one then a bloke grabbed it off of me. I chased and tracked him down to this shed and got it back. Thing is, the E string was broken, that’s why I haven’t managed to replace it yet. I do a bit of busking to earn a few bob. I like Reggae and Punk and usually do a bit of both or improvise”. He started strumming something with a reggae beat and then sun along. He was making the words up and they were about him and his God or ‘Jah’ as he liked to call Him. On another occasion, we were walking past a charity shop and he saw a violin in the window. He went in and persuaded the assistant to let him try it out. Clearly, Paul was musical. When he came out, I asked what he thought of the violin. “The strings on the bow were all frayed so it was not a good bargain”.

“Some guys came to my camp one night and tried to rob me. It is very dark here in the night and they didn’t have lights. I am pretty good in the dark because I know where everything is. I managed to roll away into the undergrowth and just hide. They couldn’t find me and got very angry. I heard them say something and then heard a ripping sound. Once they had gone I discovered they had ripped me tent. This isn’t the first time” he said pulling out a roll of Gaffer Tape and starting to repair the ripped canvas. Camping out in the woods his not such a halcyon existence!

As the days wore on, I noticed Paul’s demeanor change. He didn’t seem so happy-go-lucky. At one point in June he disappeared for a couple of weeks. He had a phone but often as not, he had no credit or it the battery was flat. Out of the blue, I got a call from him. He told me he had been in hospital. I asked what was up and he said “I have been feeling very low and things got to much and I tried to top me self”. He told me he was being transferred to another hospital and hoped to be out soon. I went by his camp each day to check on things and one day I found him asleep in his tent. He was out of food so I went with him to the food bank. Jem was just leaving but when Paul told him about his illness, he agreed to open up and give him some supplies. Jem went off inside and we sat out in the sun. Paul was sitting very quietly waiting. I couldn’t help seeing the picture in front of me. Here was someone who really needed to talk.

While Paul was in hospital his tent got vandalized again. “Someone slashed it again” he said. I told him I had seen a bunch of teenage kids riding around his camp. “All me stuff got soaked cos the rain came through the whole” he lamented. Paul looked like a shadow of the man I had first met. As we sat quietly, he hung his head and said “I’m not happy, I don’t like living like this. People think I’m happy but I’m not.” I could see he had tears in his eyes. He looked up to the sky and shouted “This is not Heaven!” It was then that I realised that he yearned for the safety and security of a home and a family that many of us take for granted.

I saw Paul several more times then he disappeared and I never saw him again. I don’t know what came of him. All I do know is that when I went back to his camp one evening, I found that his tent had been pulled down, poles broken, bedding scattered around and his clothes flung into the surrounding bushes. Then I spotted his guitar or what was left of it. It was completely smashed up and the pieces were strewn around near what used to be his campfire. But that wasn’t the thing that really got me! As I looked around I noticed something white under a bush amidst the leaf mold of the forest. I went closer and realised I was looking at the discarded copy of his Bible. It was open at the penultimate chapter of the New Testament. It is about Jude, who was also a traveler. He went from city to city spreading the gospel. His name was Judas but has become shortened. He was a living example of faithfulness to Jesus Christ, in contrast to Judas Iscariot who betrayed Him. The picture of the Bible, its pages dirty, crumpled and tattered is a poignant ending to this story about someone who was also ‘discarded’ and homeless during the Lockdown.

David Gilbert Wright
https://www.davidwright.photography/
Insta: #davidgilbertwright


If you have work which highlights the social injustices that are being intensified or laid bare by Covid-19 please submit your work to the Photojournalism Hub. Next deadline is the 4th January 2021. Please submit your work to Cinzia D’Ambrosi, cinzia@photojournalismhub.org
Further details on how to submit on our Submission page https://photojournalismhub.org/contribute-submissions/

Photo editor: Cinzia D’Ambrosi

INJUSTICES & INEQUALITIES: COVID-19 EDITION 4

As Coronavirus continues to spread throughout the world, it is increasing social injustices and bringing inequalities to the forefront.

In this fourth edition we show you two strong photography contributions. Firstly, Erhan Us shares a powerful insight into women’s lives and the harm that is inflicted upon them by patriarchal family structures in Iran which is being exacerbated during the pandemic. Secondly, Jo Fountain shares interviews and photographs that focus on the pandemic’s impact upon communities in Manchester.

These are issues we need to see, reflect upon and action.


Mummy

By Erhan Us


The Mummy Project is created to criticise the ‘ornamentation’ and disidentification of women in Iranian society that have their freedoms and preferences exploited. Since lockdown, I wanted to raise awareness on the harm patriarchal family structures incur onto women’s identity and equal rights.

About Erhan

Us is a conceptual artist and author. After studying at Bilkent University in TH Management; he was granted to 25+ local and international / honorary awards. He has participated in 70+ exhibitions in 20+ countries. He continues his studies in Sociology & Philosophy at Istanbul and Anadolu Universities. Us is a member of Photographic & Visual Arts Federations, whose book ‘Digital Prestige’ was published in 2018.

Website: Erhanus.com

Instagram: @ErhanUs


Community

By Jo Fountain


“It is true that this world
where we have difficulty breathing
Now inspires in us only evident disgust
A desire to flee without further ado
And we no longer read the headlines”
A Disappearance by Houellebecq

This photo project aims to break down social barriers to reflect how people have stood together as a
community during this time despite extreme isolation. It allows us to see the common threads of
human experience and within this highlight inequalities and injustices amongst us. There is a power
of support and acknowledgement that this is a shared responsibility. We stand together to create our own narratives. The portraits have been collected from around Manchester in the UK and with an open brief people were asked to write messages and signs to summarise their experiences or give words of support out to the world. The response has been varied, highlighting familiar phrases,
funny, invites protest, politically charged, esoteric, others personal. Accompanying  the portraits are
interviews collecting oral histories of personal experiences and issues that have been highlighted
such as effects of isolation on mental health, issues with state support responses, social care, lack of
funding, and prejudices that have been brought to the foreground to be questioned.

Overwhelmingly people have struggled with the constant and crushing weight of relentless news
stories covering daily atrocities and global crisis. There is a network of support around you if you
look for it and take part. The window acts as both a lens and a reflection on the messages that have
been created. It highlights the power of the word, graffiti, and protest banners. Even in simplified
language, and sometimes especially, there is a  re-narration of our view of the world.

Meave’s Interview

Meave Cohen

It’s been awful. Just fucking awful. I’ve had many conversations with people and
they’re like “I don’t think the pandemic’s been that bad. I’ve been able to think about
me and do my yoga and do my music and do my cooking and I’m like fuck you. Tens
of thousands of people have died. Fuck you. I’ve absolutely hated it. I genuinely
thought I would never see my mum again and that was awful. I’ve not been able to
see my niece, like, see’s only a week and a half old but … my brother wasn’t even in
the same fucking hospital when his baby went blue. It’s been fucking awful.

 
It’s been really tough with my mum but even that’s loads better now. Since we’ve been
able to see her she’s been loads better. We can’t ‘see’ her, see her, we can just see her
through the glass but now that she knows we’re alive I think she’s … I rang her yesterday.
So when you ring her you sing songs and sometimes she would join in and sometimes she
doesn’t. But yesterday she was singing all the songs and then she made up a little song.
She made up this little melody, so I finished singing a song and she just kept singing this
little melody she had made up. Adorable. We’re four of us, she’s got four children and
we’re all really engaged with her care and really engaged with all of it…. old people with
Alzheimer’s I can’t imagine, like millions of people would have died of loneliness.

My friend has got a chronic lung condition and he’s gonna get a letter through the door
soon saying it’s OK, you don’t have to shield anymore. He isn’t going to go out the house.
If he gets it he will die. So he’s going to loose his job now because the government said he
can work now, but he can’t work. They are just not able to test or trace where anything is
so you are having these local flare ups like Leister is in lockdown again. Apparently
Bradford is really bad and fucking nobody knows what’s going on because they never
managed to get rid of the virus anyway and they can’t test for it, or trace for it in the way
that would be useful because they’re fucking useless. So people like him will just never be
able to leave the house. Or, when am I ever able to give my mum a hug? Children died,
children died on their own, it’s awful. Then you’ve got fucking Dominic Cummings driving
up to Durham. It’s just awful. People died alone, people couldn’t hold their dying children. 
I’m working on this local economic… it’s called Local Economic Development but it’s
basically how local authorities shape their economies. It’s called Community Wealth

Building, and the whole idea is retaining and creating wealth within the communities. So
right now we have a model, for example, if a hospital got it’s laundry done by a local
supplier instead of say, Serco. That wealth goes back into the local area, so that local
people get employed to do that work and they then spend their money in the local shops
and cafes.

In my opinion they should have had lockdown much earlier than they did. Not like you can
go out one exercise a day or… like all of that shit that was completely un-policeable so
everyone is just doing the fuck they wanted. Obviously we don’t have a fucking police
force because they cut that to shit so they had no-one to police it anyway but .. got rid of
the virus then we could have had a gradual easing of the Lockdown.. But because we
didn’t really lockdown hard enough and we definitely didn’t lockdown early enough we’re in
this kind of semi-lockdown, until when?
 
This is a crisis of globalisation. This crisis basically means the end of Globalisation
because it was able to travel so fast and because when trade ceased and when the
borders closed, Britain in particular was in a real problem because we don’t have places
that produce PPE or places that produce hand sanitiser and we had to mobilise our
industries to try and create these things and we had mass shortages. This is why the
supermarkets ran out of food. Instead of having spare stuff to sell it’s as and when you
need it, and we’re gonna have to move away from that model. Basically we have to make
our supply chains much smaller to be able to cope with things like this. People are making
tonnes of money out of this it’s perverse. So people that already have money can make
more money but people that have no money are just fucked.
 
The entire world is in transition and transitions are very unnerving and we have no idea
what the other side is gonna look like and it’s incredibly anxiety inducing then on top of that
hundreds of thousands of people had died. And you read things like today the US has
bought up all of this specific drug. It’s not a vaccine but it’s basically like right well so…
Africa can just die. India can just die. Europe can just die. So the way that patents work is
that you make money out of curing diseases, which also applies to pandemics. It’s just
fucked. So you have to disengage a bit, I think.

Pete’s Interview

Pete Keeley

“I was freaking out because I couldn’t get any food, and it was like what the fuck,
how am I going to do this!?

I stick my foot out of the window with a bucket on a string and wait for attractive
ladies to come and give me food. But I’m still waiting for them man! I’m starving!

I joke. Dad dropped some stuff off and my mate Mark came with 4 big bags of stuff and I
ate chicken boob for about 25 days. The government food package took about 3/4 weeks.
I could have dropped dead in that time if people hadn’t have been there. It was pretty nuts.
For a lot of understandable reasons people have been very critical of the governments
response, but once this food thing was started it was incredible the way that they were
getting through to people like us. I got a letter from the the doctors saying that I needed to
shield. The way it effects Cerebral Palsy is that even when I get a cold, if I start coughing,
my whole body shakes and I have to hold on to something to stop myself falling forward.
My body kind of goes all over the place. I think they said that I was okay to calm me down
because I was freaking out.

The next thing was, you need to stop yourself going mad, and work, like I say I’ve not
worked since 1997. I would have gone super loopy without writing for theatre. That, and I
have been making Grandmaster Pea videos. A character I had developed before, who
claims he is the Tsar of the disabled, although he is self-appointed. 

I kind of felt that there was something coming and I needed to be more safe than other
people. I got this feeling and I just shut the door and that was it. That was 3 and something

months ago. I would say that lockdown has been difficult. Just trying to keep yourself
going. Once you’ve found a way of doing that, it’s okay. It was worse for me because I lost
my Mum as well. She got ill last September and died just before Christmas and dealing
with that has been tough. It wouldn’t really go away. I was really close to her and you
know, she doesn’t leave me, but that doesn’t stop you missing somebody. It’s a weird
acceptance but also hell. 

My twin brother is in a residential home which has had people with Covid in so that’s been
a concern, but I’ve been phoning and face timing him and he’s fine with being shut in
because he is on a bed a lot of the time. It’s kind of normal for him. He has the staff and he
has some connection. It is terrible, I’m not saying it’s great, but what I am saying is that in
terms of my brother, he doesn’t come out of his room much, he watches TV so it’s been a
different experience for him because we cannot visit. 

They had the problem like a lot of people, where they couldn’t get PPE, and so thats the
other thing about Grandmaster Pea as well, I gave some of the videos to a comedy night
to help raise money for actors who needed food. That was good, I felt like I was doing
things for other people, at a time when I felt like I couldn’t do anything or help. As a

disabled person, you don’t actually get the opportunity to give back to people. This was a
time when I could do that. 

I also gave money to the NHS in Mums memory, because she was a midwife, and quite
complicatedly she was a midwife, and we were born on the ward she ran. She had brought
many babies into the world and saved them from the fate that me and Christopher were
not saved from. She always blamed herself I think. We had conversations about it, I think
she wanted to be working and giving birth at the same time. I think she felt guilty, which
she shouldn’t have done, but I think that she did, bless her. Unfortunately the NHS let her
down a number of times. So, that was difficult because everyone was clapping and I was
angry and annoyed, but I still gave money to them. 

When she died she wasn’t treated well, they made what was a very difficult situation
worse. They said under no circumstances can you move this woman as she won’t be able
to walk, and that’s what they did. It’s really difficult to process that kind of brutality. I mean
this is a woman who gave years of her life caring for people. She learnt Arabic in the early
70s and felt that people should be understood. That was the incredible thing about her.
What killed me, was she was that compassionate and helped people and that’s how the

NHS sort of thanked her for it. So I have a really weird relationship with them. I mean when
the thing with PPE happened I gave money to that immediately. A big chunk of money, not
that I’m a millionaire but I felt it was important. The idea that people were risking their lives
to save other people, it’s an amazing thing that people wanted to do that, and that they
were brave enough to do it. The idea that they were not being given the support was just
disgusting”

Pete
Jag
Claire Mooney

To keep up with the story, or take part please visit lockedinlight.com or re-post your own using the signedtimes hashtag. Extend perceptions, deepen resonances, reinforce connections. Jo’s has a background in Visual Anthropology, oral history and photojournalism.


Instagram: @Jo.fountain


MANY THANKS TO OUR CONTRIBUTORS

If you have work which highlights the social injustices that are being intensified or laid bare by Covid-19 please submit your work to the Photojournalism Hub. We will be adding a dossier page on a monthly basis. Submit by October 30th to be included in the next dossier.

Photo Editors: Laura James & Cinzia D’Ambrosi


TALKING ABOUT INJUSTICES & INEQUALITIES: COVID-19

4th-12th August 2020

CONTRIBUTORS

Mini talks


Cinzia and Asha Mukanda

Cinzia D’Ambrosi, founder/director of the Photojournalism Hub is in conversation with Asha Mukanda, activist, writer and executive assistant of the Open Institute in Kenya. The conversation surrounds the impact that the current pandemic is having on the existing issue of health disparities and police brutality in Kenya. https://studio.youtube.com/video/Q8zt–YMiUc/edit


INJUSTICES AND INEQUALITIES TALK WITH SABRINA MEROLLA

Carli and Sabrina

An inspiring and insightful conversation with Sabrina who is a photojournalist creating work about her own invisible health conditions. Not only to cope with them herself but in order to help others, and highlight the way CV-19 has effected many like her.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F-_ua9Yi57E


INJUSTICES AND INEQUALITIES TALK WITH ERICA DEZONNE

Carli and Erica

https://www.instagram.com/tv/CDeoDJ6HOua/?igshid=tnfnipbyz3c2


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