About Me, and my Community – issue 1

‘About Me, and my Community’ is a photography digital visual journal showcasing the work and group activities of older residents of Hammersmith and Fulham, participants of the ‘About Me, and My Community’ photography project run by the Photojournalism Hub.

This first edition showcase photos, poetry and writings reflecting on communities and the environment. We present photographs that highlight the importance of green spaces for our community living and personal introspection. In addition, we also share a beautiful poem by one of our participants dedicated to trees and photographs that highlights moments of collectiveness, visual resonance and reflections.

PHOTOJOURNALISM NIGHTS

21st September 2022 18:00-20:30
The Invention Rooms, Imperial College
Door C, 68 Wood Lane
London
W12 7TA

To Join: HERE (in person) or HERE (online)

Photojournalism Hub presents Encarni Pindado , Jakob Dall and James Hopkirk whose work bring to the attention underreported stories of our times.

Encarni Pindado is an award-winning photojournalist and documentary photographer from Spain. Educated in Spain and London. Her work focuses on social and Human rights issues, particularly on violence, migration, and gender. She publishes in some of the most prestigious media outlets in the English and Spanish-speaking world. Such as The Guardian, BBC, The Sunday Times, Al Jazeera, NPR, Reuters, AP, El País, Univision, EFE, among many others. She also collaborates with international institutions such as the UN, ICRC, Amnesty International, UNHCR, OXFAM among many others.Encarni has a long-term project about Mesoamerican women’s migration, focusing on violence (structural, explicit, and symbolic) as a migratory experience from Central America, in transit through Mexico, to the US. She is currently finishing an MSc in Migration, Mobility and Development at SOAS University. Encarni has won several journalism scholarships and awards including, COVID19 Emergency Found from National Geographic, IWMF “underreported story grant”, Pulitzer (producer team); Peabody Award, Finalist W. Eugene Smith Humanitarian Photography Award with her work “The other side of migration: Central American women”. Her work has been exhibited in different galleries and universities across Mexico, US, and the United Kingdom, and she gives conferences and seminars on migration and photojournalism.

Jakob Dall is a freelance photojournalist with a degree from the Danish School of Journalism. He is based in Copenhagen and works as a photojournalist for several daily newspapers like New York Times, magazines, companies and organizations like Copenhagen University, The Danish Parliamentary Ombudsman’s office and with HRH Crown Prince of the Denmark, he has traveled to Mozambique, Nepal and Bangladesh to document the international work of Red Cross. He has also worked as photo editor and photographer at newspaper Berlingske Tidende and Dagbladet Information in Denmark. Jakob Dall ́s photo stories mainly focus on how individuals are affected by events which often receive little media coverage. Through his photos of people from areas of conflict, disaster and crisis he wishes to show the faces and the realities of life in areas that need attention and help from the international community. In parallel with his frequent assignments for different NGO ́s, Red Cross, Danish Church Aid, CARE, Action Aid …, Jakob is working on a personal long-term project called “Climate Change Documentary”, which illustrates the impact climate change has on living conditions and daily life for people around the world. Jakob Dall has won awards from World Press Photo, Picture of the Year International (POYi), Picture of the year Denmark and an international EISA award for his photo essay about climate change impacts in Ethiopia. He has also received the photographers “Fogtdals Grant” for his specific work with climate change impacts.

James Hopkirk has been working as a writer and photographer for over 20 years. In 2015 he launched the South London Stories project, documenting underreported aspects of life in his community. Working collaboratively with Lambeth residents, often over many months or years, he uses photography, text, film, exhibitions and workshops to explore complex social issues, including immigration, homelessness, food poverty, addiction, mental health and the benefits system. www.southlondonstories.com

Photo Above ©Jakob Dall

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Gueules Gazées

By Roberto di Mola 

Gueules Gazées is an ongoing documentary series showing the effects of tear gas among
protestors. Grins, runny noses and burning eyes are just the visible effects. According to a study published by the French association of toxicology-chemistry the aftermaths of exposure could be serious and permanent damages might be caused to the nervous system, to the breathing apparatus
and to the sight. Moreover it certifies the presence of small amounts of cyanide potentially
toxic in case of long exposures.

Gueules Gazées tries not only to underline direct consequences of potentially lethal
weapons used against civilians, but it also aims to show people’s strategies to relieve pain
and provide first aid to those affected by the gas. Heavily armed police, LBD, tear gas: are there any other more peaceful means to provide security and safeness in public order policing?

Instagram: #mirai.mir

Paris, June 2020. Milk is often used to alleviate burns that reach the eyes. Here, after
the passage of the demonstrators, milk flows on the street.
Paris, June 2020. A protester makes a grimace of pain.
Paris, June 2020. A protester sprays his face with milk.
Paris, June 2020. A demonstrator receives assistance.
Paris, July 2020. A typical riot police squad: one of them is holding a LBD gun. The
majority of serious injuries are caused by the reckless use of this weapon.
Paris, June 2020. A Parisian café after being attacked with tear gas.
Paris, June 2020. A man trying to get out from the café after the attack.
Paris, June 2020. More and more protesters, aware of the effects, equip themselves with the necessary to provide first aid.

Paris, June 2020.In this case an umbrella is used to better protect themselves from
“toxic winds”.

Paris, July 2020. Another technique is used to curl up against the wind.

Photographs by Roberto di Mola
Instagram: #mirai.mir