Documentary Photography Workshops for young people

We offer Documentary Photography Workshops for youths 16-32 years old.

The Workshops provide lessons in documentary photography and the development of photo stories through practical assignments and personal projects leading to the creation of a strong portfolio of work, key for pursuing a career in media and/or entry to further education.

Participants will also have the opportunity to be involved in the development of a youth magazine including the publishing of one’s own work in its pages.

The Workshops are supported by West London NHS Trust, Hammersmith and Fulham, Sobus, and are Free for young people living in Hammersmith and Fulham council, and in particularly those that live in underrepresented wards such as White City, Wormholt, Fulham, Shepherds Bush and North Kensington.

Dates and Place
Workshops run on Saturdays (three Saturdays per month in person, and one Saturday remotely to work on the design and layout of the magazine)
Factory Quarter Community Hub, Unit 3, Tesla Court Warple Way, London W3 7DQ. 11 am to 1:30 pm

What you will gain
Our photography programme is designed to provide participants with the understanding of documentary photography practice and the tools to conduct visual investigations.
The programme is a great opportunity to gain practical experience, receive peer support and develop connections with like minded people. Participants will gain a portfolio of visual work, including the opportunity to be involved and publish your own work on the Photojournalism Hub youth documentary photography magazine. By gaining a portfolio of visual stories combined with publishing material, participants will have a positive outlook for entering further education and/or for gaining work opportunities.

Who can apply
The Documentary Photography workshops are open to youths 16 to 32 years old. No previous experience is required.

Costs
This programme is completely free for young people resident of Hammersmith and Fulham council.
We do offer a range of workshops of low costs workshops. We will need to ask for a small fee £5 from anyone living outside the borough. Please inquiry with us.

How to apply
Please email Cinzia, admin@photojournalismhub.org or call 07960940766 with your interest to the course.

About the Facilitator

Cinzia D’Ambrosi is an award-winning photojournalist, documentary photographer and journalist, and she is the founder and director of the Photojournalism Hub.
Cinzia contributes to a number of editorials such as Der Spiegel, New Internationalist, Warscapes, BBC, and The Guardian, and often works with international charities and organisations such as Amnesty International, Protection Approaches, and Germany Refugee Council producing stories for advocacy campaigns and exhibition. Her work has been exhibited in numerous exhibitions in Europe and broadcasted in various TV and radio outlets, including in the Czech National TV. Cinzia’s photo project ‘Hate Hurts’ was selected for the European Month of Photography in Bulgaria (2018), won an Award from the Photographers Gallery in London (2017), her short film ‘Prejudice and us’ on the impact of racism and prejudice on London young people’s lives received ‘Best Campaign’ Award from Hammersmith United Charities (2016), Hate Hurts project was selected by Amnesty International Czech Republic to tour as a solo exhibition in Czech Republic for a year in 2019-2020. Cinzia’s photography work has received support and commissions from Arts Council England, Big Local Trust, Hammersmith United Charities, Amnesty International Hungary, Amnesty International Czech, Amnesty International Hamburg, Westfield London, German Refugee Council. Cinzia has received the Spiga d’Argento Award (2022) for her contribution to peace with her photojournalism work.

The project is kindly supported by Hammersmith & Fulham Council, Sobus and the NHS Trust West London.

Why shop small business?

Photojournalism Hub presents Why shop small business? – the latest edition of documentary photography and writings from our local young and senior participants of our documentary photography courses.
Why shop small business? brought a lot of conversations and critical analysis on what it really means. Are we shopping more ethically because more conscious of what we eat? Are we more aware of the authenticity and the personal experiences that one has in small independent outlerier. Or the choices of shopping small points to having the economic capacity to do so and thus a statement of wealth. One pervading reflection is that shopping small is very much tied to serving communities. We could say that we have many communities around each local shop, something that we cannot find in much bigger commercial chain.

We have printed a number of copies of the magazine for our beneficiaries and for sharing and making it available in our community. If you would like a copy or discuss a feature, please contact us.

We would like to thank the NHS West London Trust, Hammersmith & Fulham Council, Sobus and Hammersmith United Charities for their support.

Support our work and become a Photojournalism Hub member! and receive the benefits of free access to events, resources, premier editorial content, and discounts on entry to our photography exhibitions, training and shop. You will be supporting our work advocating, advancing social justice and human rights, amplifying community voices and enhance media educational and work opportunities to those facing social, economic and structural challenges. Support the Photojournalism Hub from as little as £1 every month. Thank you. Join us HERE

IN FOCUS

26th February 2024, 7 pm
Riverside Studios
101 Queen Caroline Street
London W6 9BN

To Join us: HERE

Photojournalism Hub and Riverside Studios are delighted to announce Denise Laura Baker and Etienne Bruce as the featured photographers for ‘In Focus,’ a captivating series of photography events. This series delves deep into the realm of socially engaged documentary photography, using the lens as a powerful tool for engagement and exploration. The event includes presentations, live interactive Q&As and a social.
Etienne Bruce will present us Xenitia, which is an archive, centered on displacement to Greece. It is framed by two motifs: “nostos” (Classical Greek; to return home, homecoming) and “algos” (Classical Greek; pain, grief). Together, these affect-laden words form the root of “nostalgia”. “Xenitia” itself is a Greek term that encompasses the state of being a foreigner, otherness, estrangement, loss, distance, and a profound yearning for home soil. And Dr. Denise Laura Baker will share Deeds, Not Words: motivations and methods of resistance from a photographer’s perspective, currently being shown until April 13th at Gallery 74, Waterside Arts in Sale, Manchester, which explores the myriad ways photography crosses into the realm of activism and the complex relationship between photojournalism and activism.

Denise Laura Baker is a socially engaged photojournalist and documentary photographer and storyteller, focusing on environmental and social issues, climate change, activism, and community. Through these she explores themes of connection, journeys, identity, change and transition. Denise’s photographic and creative work draws on influences from her career as a visual artist, and her previous career as an ethnographic psychologist where she interviewed and collected the stories of the people with whom she worked. In March 2020 she was featured as an emerging female photographer in film  https://analoguewonderland.co.uk/blogs/film-news/female-voices-in-film-denise-laura-baker and in 2021 and 2022 she won PX3 State of the World. She has published numerous photographs in the mainstream press as well as photo essays in magazines such as New Internationalist, Open Democracy and Novara Media. Her work has been featured in group exhibitions as well as solo shows most notably LLAWN Llandudno Arts Weekend in 2019, Galeri Caernarfon, North Wales 2022, Islington Climate Centre 2023, The Black E Gallery in Liverpool as part of The World Transformed 2023 and Open Eye Gallery, Liverpool 2023. Denise’s work is currently being shown until April 13th at Gallery 74, Waterside Arts in Sale, Manchester. 
Denise teaches and mentors, runs community arts workshops, and has received funding through the Arts Council for Wales, Creative Gwynedd, RBKC Creative Grants, The Westway Trust and Imaginary Millions. With Deeds, Not Words (Deeds, Not Words: motivations and methods of resistance from a photographer’s perspective) Denise explores the myriad ways photography crosses into the realm of activism and the complex relationship between photojournalism and activism. In this project she examines protest through the female eye, which has enabled her to connect with her own background in activism as well as others, and her relationship to photography as activism. @deniselaurabaker

Etienne Bruce is an Anglo-French visual artist, editorial photographer and educator currently based in London, UK. Her project-based work is a form of documentation driven by an engagement with the nature of the photographic image, which often includes an element of recording oral histories. A preoccupation with the relationship between form and content has led her to embrace different modes of expression including text, movement, sound, space, sequence and literary forms as portals through which to re-examine documentary image-making practice and embrace its inherent ambiguity. Through her work, Etienne seeks to challenge her perceptions and reinterpret things as she understands them while always striving to engage respectfully and collaboratively with the people and stories that are central to her practice. Etienne is a member of Women Photograph, she is Education & Training Manager at The Photography Foundation, and her book Xenitia was published by Zone6 Press in 2023. @etienne_bruce

BECOME A PJH MEMBER
Consider becoming a member of the Photojournalism Hub and receive the benefits of free access to events, resources, premier editorial content, portfolio reviews, and discounts on entry to our photography exhibitions, training and in our shop, whilst you will be supporting our work advocating, advancing social justice and human rights, amplifying community voices and enhance access to media to those facing social, economic and structural challenges. If there were ever a time to join us, it is now. Support the Photojournalism Hub from as little as £1 every month. If you can, please consider supporting us with a regular amount each month. Thank you. JOIN US HERE

CAPTURING CRISIS

In this new edition of ‘Capturing Crisis’ youth photography magazine, we present a special edition on a local coffee shop to learn of its championing and success. We present a photo essay on the charity Nourish Hub documenting its cycle of sustainability, healthy and free food for all.
Our young team also reported on Free Palestine local and national responses. And we present evocative images at Meanwhile Gardens, a photo story on volunteers creating a community garden at Factory Quarter in west London.
In the last pages, we present the world of teenagers and friends, and a few portraits from a series of portraits of staff at The Globe, the dedicated Shakespeare Theatre in central London. We hope you enjoy Capturing Crisis youth magazine!

Capturing Crisis is a youth documentary and photojournalism magazine. All features and photographs are created by participants of ‘Stories, Reporting Mag, Photography Course’.
The magazine provides the opportunity for youths who never had access to, to share their photography and photo stories to a large audience. Photojournalism Hub is committed to providing opportunities and support to youths, enabling equality in accessing opportunities for further education and work in the photo industry.
Capturing Crisis magazine is a testament of the great work and inspiring contribution of our youths.

The project is supported by the NHS west London trust, Hammersmith and Fulham Council and Sobus.

National Demonstration Free Palestine

National Demonstration for Free Palestine and a Ceasefire Now in London, 25th November 2023.

At Photojournalism Hub we work for social justice and human rights through publishing, promoting and supporting the work of independent photojournalists and documentary photographers. It is our belief that no one should be killed for their faith, ethnicity, nationality. What we are witnessing every day in the past 7 weeks has hurt us immensely. It is wrong to tackle acts of terrorism by disproportionately or indiscriminately killing and injuring civilians, women and children. We hope for a Ceasefire and for Palestinians right to peace, security and to live in their own independent state, free from occupation. We stand for Peace and an end of war.

Below are some photographs from our team on pro Palestine marches in London.

©Cinzia D’Ambrosi

©Cinzia D’Ambrosi

@Cinzia D’Ambrosi

©Safeena Chaudhry

©Sienna Sunna

Cinzia D’Ambrosi @cinziadambrosi
Safeena Chaudhry  @photographerdreamertraveller

Sienna Sunna

Capturing Crisis

I am incredibly pleased to present the fifth edition of Capturing Crisis photography and reporting magazine produced by the group of youths of the ‘Stories, Reporting Mag, Photography Course’ project.
Responding to the cost of living crisis, the young photographers have produced photo stories and photographs covering topics that expose social justice issues as well as current social and environmental changes.
In this issue, you will find photo stories documenting a community led urban space called ‘Meanwhile’ and street photography that in a candid manner seek to document the impact of the economic crisis.
I am very proud for the commitment, talent and drive demonstrated by the young participants.

Photojournalism Nights 30th edition

©Samira Oulaillah
©Natisha Mallick

25th January 2023, 18:30 – 21:30 
The Invention Rooms
Imperial College Door C
68 Wood Lane
London W12 7T

More info, and to book HERE

Photojournalism Hub presents Natisha Mallick and Samira Oulaillah to the 30th edition of the Photojournalism Nights event at The Invention Rooms, Imperial College London.

Both award winning photographers work on under-reported topics that need incredible courage and access to be able to tell, including Natisha’ stories on Muslim men being falsely implicated in terror cases and the challenges of child birth in India, and Samira’s project ‘Breaking the Silence’, exploring the testimonies of former Israeli soldiers who quit the army to join an organization called “Breaking the Silence” – founded in 1995 by former soldiers- who decided to testify against their own actions in the occupied territories.

Natisha Mallick is a computer engineer by education and a documentary photographer who focused her work on under-reported stories in India. She hopes that her images contribute to the public enhancement of unbalanced situations. Her work has been published in Spiegel Online, The Wire, The Quint, Fountain Ink Magazine, The Irish Times, Scroll, Catch News, Private Photo Review and L’ oeil de la photographie. Shortlisted twice for the Marilyn Stafford Foto Reportage Award in 2018 & 2017 for her work on Muslim Men falsely implicated in terror cases. Natisha’s work on Child Births in Rural India was awarded the Child Survival Media Award by National Foundation for India and Save the children and was also shortlisted for the Photocrati Fund. She was the recipient of the Neel Dongre Grant by India Photo Archive Foundation and the Oslo University College Grant. Interested in Data Stories, Natisha is transitioning into the tech/data space and presently working towards her Masters in Big Data Science from Queen Mary University of London. http://natishamallick.com/

Samira Oulaillah, a French filmmaker and documentary photographer, has extensively worked in the last ten years on global issues related to war, refugees, gender issues, child poverty and racial discrimination, producing numerous documentaries for international cable television and presenting documentary photography for various media outlets and NGOs. She has widely travelled across the world to shoot hard-hitting documentaries and immersive photographic reportages that give a voice to the voiceless and a face to the forgotten. Samira holds an MA in Documentary Photography & Photojournalism (UAL London College of Communication) and an MA in Social History (Winchester University). She is currently preparing a PhD with the Sorbonne University in Paris and working on the impact of white colonial photography in West Africa on the representation of native people and the revival of African identity and collective memory through the work of contemporary Malian photographer Malick Sidibé and Senegalese photographer Oumar Ly. https://samira.photoshelter.com/

BECOME A PJH MEMBER
Consider becoming a member of the Photojournalism Hub and receive the benefits of free access to events, Photojournalism Hub resources, premier editorial content, portfolio reviews, photography exhibitions, discounts on our courses and training, whilst you will be supporting our work advocating, advancing social justice and human rights. If there were ever a time to join us, it is now. Support the Photojournalism Hub from as little as £1 every month. If you can, please consider supporting us with a regular amount each month. Thank you. JOIN US HERE

Photojournalism Nights x Christmas Social

13th December 2022 18:00-21:30
The Invention Rooms, Imperial College
Door C, 68 Wood Lane
London
W12 7TA

To Book: HERE

We are delighted to announce the last Photojournalism Nights event of the year with a special festive edition! Come along and join our guest speakers of the night, take part in the conversations and cheers!
All are welcome to bring  (alcoholic) beverages if you wish, whilst tea and coffee is on offer at the venue. We look forward to seeing many of you!

Francesco Marchetti is an Italian born photographer living in London. Francesco combines his daily job with his passion for photography. He has completed a course in reportage photography at the Central Saint Martins, University of the Arts, and he is an associate member of the Royal Photographic Society (ARPS). His work span from documentary to street photography, has been recognised at several international photography awards, and exhibited in both individual and collective exhibitions in the UK and abroad. He has cooperated with various NGOs and worked on the community support projects in the UK, Serbia, Uganda and Ethiopia.

Jonny Pickup is an internationally published, multi-award-winning photojournalist and documentary filmmaker from Cornwall, England. His work focuses on the often unseen or forgotten areas of society, using still and motion imagery to help us question contemporary global issues. In 2021 he was awarded the Rory Peck Training Fund and is part of the Front Line Freelance Register. In 2015—despite not having an undergraduate degree—Jonny was invited to start a Masters at Leeds University at the School of Media and Communication focussing on documentary film and photography. An unconventional invitation based on the exceptional portfolio he had developed independently. He graduated in 2016 with a high distinction winning the prestigious University award for outstanding work. In 2018 he won the Platinum Remi Award at the 51st Huston International Film festival for his first documentary ‘The Bare Knuckle Carer’, past winners include directors such as George Lucas and the Coen Brothers. His second short ‘Ambazoina’—which required him to be smuggled into Cameroon—won Best Documentary Short at Bafta Cymru qualifying Carmarthen Bay Film Festival in 2020, and is being distributed by Journeyman Shorts. As a photojournalist, Jonny has covered world events and current affairs for publications such as National Geographic, The Telegraph, and Foreign Policy Magazine, and freelances for Getty Photo Agency. In 2019 he won Gold at Tokyo International Photography Awards. In 2020, he has become one of the 30-photographers selected to exhibit as part of the Paris Photo Prize ‘State of the World’ exhibition, and in 2021 he was exhibited at FotoNostrum Mediterranean House of Photography as part of the 17th Pollux Awards.

BECOME A PJH MEMBER
Consider becoming a member of the Photojournalism Hub and receive the benefits of free access to events, Photojournalism Hub resources, premier editorial content, portfolio reviews, photography exhibitions, discounts on our courses and training, whilst you will be supporting our work advocating, advancing social justice and human rights. If there were ever a time to join us, it is now. Support the Photojournalism Hub from as little as £1 every month. If you can, please consider supporting us with a regular amount each month. Thank you. Join us: HERE

PHOTOJOURNALISM NIGHTS 28TH EDITION

Yemen: UN has declared the situation in Yemen as the greatest humanitarian disaster in 2018. ©RasmusFlindtPedersen

23rd November 2022 18:00-20:30
The Invention Rooms, Imperial College
Door C, 68 Wood Lane
London
W12 7TA

To join us HERE (in person) and HERE (online)

Photojournalism Hub presents Carly Clarke, Francesca Gabbiadini and Rasmus Flindt Pedersen.
Carly Clarke is a British documentary and portrait photographer working primarily with medium format film. After completing her BA in photography at Middlesex University, London she was awarded the Luck-Hille Postgraduate Photography scholarship for her Master’s degree in Photography, also at Middlesex. Her work mainly focuses on social and political issues that may otherwise go unnoticed. Storytelling through the voices of the people she photographs is key to her work. She has personally researched, organised and sought funding for all of her overseas projects, which include – Remember Me: Vancouver’s DTES, Godhūlikāla: India’s Forgotten Elders and Jamadagni’s Temple: The Real Full Moon Festival. When she was diagnosed with Hodgkin Lymphoma in 2012, she created a self-portrait project, Reality Trauma, documenting her journey through treatment and recovery. She subsequently created a second project, In the Blood, seven years later when her younger brother Joe was diagnosed with the same type of cancer. Reality Trauma has been widely commended and has been featured worldwide on BBC News Online, BBC TV local news, photography podcasts, and a radio show. She has won several honourable mentions for her projects through the International Photography Awards (IPA) and has been shortlisted for the Portrait of Britain. Her work has been published by the BBC, in the British Journal of Photography, Portrait of Britain, the charity Lymphoma Action, International Photography Awards (IPA), Suitcase Magazine, Jornal Contacto, POV Magazine (Canada), Lensculture, Portrait Salon and has been shown at the National Portrait Gallery in London. www.carlyclarkephotography.co.uk

Francesca Gabbiadini is a photojournalist from Italy. She reports on socio cultural taboos related to femininity and female identities into current society. Her two major ongoing projects are “The Call of Eve”, focused on female rage and the places where it can be expressed, and “Because”, a participatory archive on female identities. After the Master’s in Documentary Photography and Photojournalism at the University of Westminster (2018), she has been working as a freelance photojournalist in London. She collaborates with international and national media outlets, such as La Repubblica and Elle magazine. Francesca’s projects have been shown in various exhibitions between Italy and London, such as the group exhibition at the International Centre of Photography in Palermo (2021) led by Letizia Battaglia. In March 2022 she co-founded Femminsista, an international and intersectional feminist community on Instagram, where she works as an Editor-in-Chief. In May 2019, Francesca led the first workshop on documentary photography in Bergamo, Italy, with the editorial goal to ethically report the community of one of the city’s most multicultural neighbourhoods. www.francescagabbiadini.com

Rasmus Flindt Pedersen (40) is a Danish photojournalist, documentary filmmaker and father of two with 10+ years of experience documenting the world around him. He has won several awards for his work and has had his images exhibited in places like London, New York, Tokyo, Paris and Copenhagen. His work in the world’s hotspots has focused more on depicting the everyday struggle of civilians trapped in the war zones than on the actual fighting. It’s not that the dramatic photos of combat aren’t important to him, it’s just that he finds the struggles of regular people much more impactful. Rasmus’ latest war assignment brought him to Ukraine to document the initial phases of the Russian invasion at the beginning of the year. During the summer Rasmus has spent more time home to focus on his own family and the birth of his second son before he’ll start work on a documentary film project early next year. www.flindtpedersen.com

Photo Above ©Rasmus Flindt Pedersen

BECOME A PJH MEMBER
Consider becoming a member of the Photojournalism Hub and receive the benefits of free access to events, Photojournalism Hub resources, premier editorial content, portfolio reviews, photography exhibitions, discounts on our courses and training, whilst you will be supporting our work advocating, advancing social justice and human rights. If there were ever a time to join us, it is now. Support the Photojournalism Hub from as little as £1 every month. If you can, please consider supporting us with a regular amount each month. Thank you. JOIN US HERE

About Me, and my Community – issue 2

In the second edition of ‘About Me, and my Community’, we present stories and photography on ‘The impact of regeneration on local communities’. The published stories look at the positive and negative aspects of regeneration, the changes of local spaces such as local markets and shops as well as explore what community means in a personal level.

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