Photojournalism Nights 20th edition

Photojournalism Hub twentieth edition of the Photojournalism Nights presents a superb line-up of guest photographers: Carol Allen StoreyChristopher Bethell Kevin Percival 

Hotel Elephant
1-5 Spare Street

London
SE17 3EP

17th February 2022 06:30 pm till late

To learn more and to join us follow this link here.

Elizabeth provides some physical comfort to her sonAmon by gently bathing him in the shade of banana trees.His body withered from the AIDS virus. Kamughobe , Uganda Carol Allen Storey
©Chris Bethell
This image was taken as part of the Wornington Word project, which documents through photography and oral history, the little-known story of a single housing estate in Kensington, West London. Set against a background of austerity, gentrification and the Grenfell tower fire, the estate is vividly illustrated through photographs of people and place and the residents’ own stories. Grace has lived on the estate since she was 28. ©Kevin Percival

Photojournalism Hub is an independent community-based organisation that engages in the fight against social injustice and human rights violations through photojournalism and independent journalism. Photojournalism Hub believes that independent journalism and photojournalism is the key for social justice advocacy and a means for elevating the silenced voices. Photojournalism Nights is a monthly event in which photojournalists and documentary photographers working on exposing human rights and social injustices present and speak about their work increasing awareness and engagement to the issues being covered.

White City Place Photography Zines

Presenting ‘Photography at White City Place’ zines produced with the participants of a series of Photography Workshops at White City Place in November 2021.

With the kind support of Stanhope Plc, Photojournalism Hub facilitated photography workshops for the local community and those working/living within the White City Place. Young and older people of various background and experiences joined in the workshops and worked on a photo story of each other whilst learning the basic of visual narrative and photography. Through the three weeks, participants developed a visual narrative whilst getting to know each other using the grounds of White City Place and surrounding area. They explored interview technique, environmental portraiture, single images and series resulting in creative, inspiring photo stories of each other. Below we share the digital copy of the White City Place Photography Zines. Printed copies are available at White City Place.

Photojournalism Nights 19th edition

Photojournalism Hub nineteenth edition of the Photojournalism Nights presents a superb line-up of guest photographers: Diego RadamesGodelive KasangatiNic Madge.

To join us here

CEUTA, SPAIN – MAY 19. group of migrants who came swimming to Ceuta are intercepted by the Spanish army on May 19, 2021. Approximately 8 thousand migrants, mostly Moroccans, have crossed the Spanish border through the Tarajal pass since last Monday. Thousands have been returned to Morocco. ©Diego Radames
©Nic Madge
DRC, Kinshsa, Notre-Dame de Lemba Catholic Church, the main hallway of the church. ©Godelive Kasangati

Photojournalism Nights 18th edition

Photojournalism Hub eighteenth edition of the Photojournalism Nights presents a superb line-up of guest photographers: Susannah Ireland, Jermaine Francis, Sabrina Merolla.

25th November 18:30 PM

The Invention Rooms
68 Wood Lane
London
W12 7TA

To Join: HERE

Rumi Munawar, former Miss Pakistan for UAE 2015 pictured in Sharjah, United Arab Emirates, 14th October 2016. Photo Credit: Susannah Ireland
Credit: Jermaine Francis
City, Country, Date DD MMM YYYY

Susannah Ireland, is a freelance photojournalist and documentary photographer based in London, UK but working internationally as well. She began her photojournalism career on a local news agency in Birmingham in 2006, graduating to London the following year to work principally for The Times and Independent newspapers. Following a brief stint working in India, Susannah moved back to London and now undertakes news, features and portraits assignments for a variety of international clients such as NBC News, The New York Times and NRC Handelsblad. She is a member of Women Photograph – a platform of independent photographers working to elevate the voices of women and non-binary visual storytellers worldwide. She is particularly interested in documenting the humanitarian impact of conflict and environmental disasters on local communities.

Jermaine Francis, is a London based Photographer who works with portraiture and conceptual documentary projects, using editorial, personal projects, and books as vehicles to tell these stories! Jermaine’s work has appeared in publications such as I-D, The Face Magazine, Autre Magazine & Beauty Papers. His work has recently appeared in Aperture’s latest publication the monograph Photo No, No’s, as well ICP book ICP Concerned, Global Images for Global crisis! Jermaine’s work has also exhibited at the National Portrait Gallery as part of the Taylor Wessing, The International Centre of Photography NYC in the group show #ICPConcerned and his solo show ‘The Invisibles’.

Sabrina Merolla has collaborated with Photojournalism Hub for more than one year. She is an awarded photographer, cultural studies researcher, multimedia journalist and participatory photography facilitator. Sabrina has a strong work ethic and is committed to telling stories in which the general fairness of the narration is granted by long pre-field and on-field research. She focuses on the environment, communities, health and human rights.

Donations are welcome. To Join: HERE

PHOTOJOURNALISM NIGHTS 8th EDITION

02nd December 18:30-21:00 ONLINE

©Jim Mortram
©Kristian Buus
©Maria Tomas Rodriguez

The Photojournalism Hub presents a Live Stream of the 8th Edition of the Photojournalism Nights.

Please join the live stream of the Photojournalist Hub eighth edition of the Photojournalism Nights with an amazing line-up of photographers: Jim MortramKristian BuusMaria Tomas Rodriguez.

Jim Mortram, is a social documentary photographer and writer, based in Dereham, Norfolk. He is well known for his powerful and ongoing project , Small Town Inertia, which records the lives of a number of disadvantaged and marginalised people living near to his home, in order to tell stories he believes are under-reported.

Kristian Buus, is a freelance photographer based between London and Copenhagen. Much of Kristian’s work is covering protests and civil disobedience which relates to climate change issues and civil rights. Over the years he has been on the frontline of many direct actions in the UK following events, often very fast moving, involving police and a lot of stress covering them from a news perspective. Over the past few years, Kristian has focused on getting to know through portraiture and interviews, what drives people who put themselves at risk of arrest and possible injury, to amplify their voices. With this approach, he has covered the early stages of Extinction Rebellion and the Stansted 15 protests.

Maria Tomas Rodriguez, is a senior lecturer in Aeronautical Engineering in the School of Mathematics, Computer Science & Engineering. Among the many awards, Maria has won the Best Documentary Photography Award at the prestigious 2019 British Photography Awards with her work that focuses on Senegalese traditions.The Photojournalism Nights is an event that promotes committed and courageous photojournalism and engages the public to social justice and human rights.

To join us HERE

Interview with Clare Thomas, Photojournalism Nights guest speaker

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©Claire Thomas – Injured and sick civilians are treated at a makeshift field clinic set up inside an abandoned store on the edge of Mosul’s Old City as the fighting continues to liberate the remaining ISIS-held territory, on July 4, 2017.

Claire Thomas is a photographer and photojournalist from Wales, UK, currently based between London and New York. Her photojournalism work focuses on issues relating to global political and military conflicts, human rights, and humanitarian and environmental crises. During her extraordinary career, Claire has produced compelling and timely images and has been extensively covering frontlines battles in ISIS in Iraq.

Q. How did you end up going to Iraq?

In December 2016, I decided to travel to Iraq independently with the goal of focusing on stories related to the military offensive to liberate the city of Mosul and the humanitarian crisis of people displaced by ISIS. Before that, I was based in Greece covering the refugee crisis where I met Kurdish and Iraqi families who had been displaced by ISIS. Hearing their stories, I wanted to better understand the horror that was driving people to flee their homes and risk their lives trying to reach the safety of European shores. As there was a lot of media attention on the war against ISIS in Mosul at the time, I decided to head to Erbil, the capital of the Kurdistan region of Iraq, and an entry point to Mosul.

Q. How long were you there for in total? Will you go back? 

My first visit to Iraq was for just 2 weeks, but I returned a few weeks later and ended up living in northern Iraq for two and a half years. I’ve been back for a few short trips since I left in June last year, and I hope to return later this year or next year. Erbil was my home for a long time, and I became very fond of the place and the people, so I think I’ll always go back whenever the opportunity arises. There’s certainly no shortage of stories to cover in the country, and I’m particularly interested to follow the progress of rebuilding the city of Mosul, which was heavily bombed during the battle against ISIS.

Q. This is very traumatic work, what do you do to decompress after a trip like this? How do you look after your mental health while working? 

I was lucky to have a great support network in Iraq, among other photographers and journalists, the medics I embedded with in Mosul, and also local friends and fixers. My way of decompressing is simply to talk about the situation, which helps me process my own thoughts and feelings, and I was glad that I had a lot of people I could talk to in Iraq.

I think it’s important to be aware of the emotional impact of doing this kind of work, and also to keep in mind that, as outsiders, it’s our choice to be there and we’re extremely lucky to be able to leave the war zone and go back to the safety of our homes at any time.

Of course, being confronted by violence and death is challenging and disturbing, and even more so is seeing people suffering the terror, pain and loss of war. The images that stick in my mind are of mothers crying over the bodies of their children, of soldiers wailing uncontrollably over a fallen comrade, of proud fathers broken by the loss of their loved ones, and the tearless look of shock on the faces of traumatised children. However, I try to focus my thoughts and energy on the incredible strength and resilience of the survivors and the people who helped them survive.

Q. I’m new to photojournalism – self teaching at the moment. How did you get started and did you go through formal means? And how did you get to work in Iraq? Did you pitch to someone as an independent? Would be great to know how it all works. 

I’m also self-taught with no formal training in photojournalism. I studied Politics at University, and after I graduated I spent several years travelling and working overseas. During that time, I developed my interest and skills in photography, and eventually started doing some freelance photography work for my local newspaper in Wales. After a few assignments in Wales I travelled to Palestine where I began producing photo essays about life in the occupied West Bank, which I pitched to several mainstream media outlets.

As a freelancer, I really appreciate having the flexibility and freedom to choose which countries I work in and which stories I cover. Of course, that flexibility comes with the necessity for extreme self-motivation, self-discipline and organisation, as well as the financial burden of paying our own expenses in the hope of selling the work afterwards.

My decision to go to Iraq was one I made independently – I wasn’t sent there by any media outlet. Once I arrived in Erbil, I spoke with a lot of other journalists and fixers to better understand the context and get an idea of stories I could cover that weren’t as widely covered as the military operation in Mosul. In the beginning, I captured the content needed for the story I wanted to cover – photos and interviews – and then sent a pitch with a small sample of images to media outlets. Once editors got to know me and my work, I started to get more commissioned assignments, often working alongside a writer.

It took me a long time to understand how the industry works for freelancers. For me, the most difficult part about being a freelance photojournalist is not the photography or journalism work itself but finding ways to get the attention of editors and my work published. I’m still learning myself, and the best advice I can give is to be persistent and determined, and get to know the publications you want to contribute to.

Clare Thomas
www.clairethomasphotography.com
https://www.instagram.com/claire_thomas_photography/


Interview with Felipe Paiva, Photojournalism Nights guest speaker

©Felipe Paiva

Felipe Paiva is a photojournalist from Brazil currently based in Paris, France. He is a post graduate in cinema and photojournalism and has been working on field covering countries such as France, Brazil, Iraq, Syria, Ukraine and Russia, including frontline work.

Q. How do you find a not obvious story to document? Any advice to new photojournalists?

To any new person, in any field, I would recommend doing a bit of the obvious. For the sole reason of getting familiar to the operations involved in the work. To find a non-obvious story I would say it is a good thing to get an obvious story and from that, extract something more personal. Maybe a character on that story has something that is not really related to the story but it is super interesting or of human value. 

One example is something I did in Ukraine. I went there to do work related to the conflict but I ended up meeting a gymnastic athlete from Donetsk. She took me to their training gym and I could have gone after her persona story. A young girl that dreams of going into the Olympics. Donetsk is known for having good athletes but nowadays is not part of any recognized country. So, its citizens train very hard, with old equipment, in a region that has seen its economy devastated by the ongoing conflict. Unfortunately, I couldn’t because of the short time I had in the whole country.

I hope that helps a bit. Other than that, go and do lots of stories, even if they won’t be published or if they are very local and “small”

https://www.felipepaivaimg.com/


Photojournalists answer questions on their work

The third Photojournalism Nights event guests speakers Jillian Edelstein, Roland RamananValentina Schivardi answer questions posed from the audience on their work and practice. Their answer lead us into their journey of resilience and commitment in voicing stories of prejudice, injustice and poverty.

Roland Ramanan


©Roland Ramanan

From Sabrina Merolla : Well, you say you are not a photojournalist, but you are showing a stunning example of long-form traditional documentary photography. And the method you described, plus the interviews, make me think of serious socio-anthropological research perspectives. Out of curiosity: what do you teach and what kind of formation do you have?
I would certainly say that I am working within the long form documentary tradition with people like Eugene Richards being a big influence. Richards was a social worker and I am a special needs teacher. I started as a primary school teacher and now I work with a local authority advisory service. I think this gives me a certain training to be able to work with people, empathise and present my ideas.

Really powerful stories and you have shown them all as whole human beings without judgement. You obviously gained their trust, how did you establish consent?

I establish consent by showing them honesty and trying to be clear about what I am doing. That was not always easy and I had set backs. A piece about my work in the local newspaper (which I thought was written sensitively) damaged my relationship with some individuals for a long time. I have more or less given up on trying to get formal written consent, I think it establishes more barriers than it removes. I try to show the work as its developing as much as I can practically can. At the start of the project I didn’t really know what my aims were, now I can be much clearer with people what I’m trying to do and that really helps to build trust. That, and just being there; relentlessly!

Roland, how do you feel about the work now and how do you see the work evolving or is it now finished.

Well, its not finished in terms of becoming a book. I have this on good advice from my mentor and others I trust so I need to keep working and thinking about different angles. Sometimes, nothing happens in the work and I get very down and frustrated but it just takes one good picture to lift my spirits. Just being there and hanging out for hours is something I find gets harder but its what I need to do. You need to find new angles to generate different situations. So at the moment , that means going to the foodbank/church and joining there – once it starts up again. That may lead to other things like photographing a baptism which would be amazing – tantalisingly now just out of reach. But I’m in no particular hurry.

Very interesting work but there are some ethical issues for me when photographing vulnerable people. Do you make people aware of the fact the photos are being made public? Do you get model release forms from people?

I did worry a lot, previously about model release but I don’t need it for a documentary/art project. It is non-commercial use. In the end, you simply have to demonstrate your own integrity and question your own motives over and over again. No model release is a substitute for that.

Roland Ramanan http://rolandramanan.com/

Roland Ramanan’s compelling image of Nina from his powerful ‘Gillett Square’ series is featured among other great photographers in Paul Sng’s This Separated Isle photobook, which is currently being crowdfunded on- https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/invisiblebritain/this-separated-isle If you can, please support this photobook of stories and portraits exploring concepts of identity in modern Britain.


JILLIAN EDELSTEIN

©Jillian Edelstein

How did you protect yourself from the trauma of these stories?

I think it was hard for people to see people (mainly men) who had performed unspeakable acts and atrocities, walk free …but the concept of forgiveness espoused by Tutu, Mandela allowed that to happen. It is to be commended and admired. It was a powerful ‘tool’ to call upon, to draw out, to involve many victims of human rights abuse, torture and conflict. The fact that it happened was remarkable. It helped. It may not have healed but it was powerful in the transition process. I don’t think it ever hoped to turn things around overnight. The compromise is that it is human fragility, survival , emotion at stake ; sadly we don’t seem to learn from history.The after effects of Apartheid and it’s ugly legacy will be felt for decades to come.I was lucky enough to be able to ‘come and go’ as I had my work, my family life in the UK, so being able to leave it, feel a certain distance from it and then later revisit the horror of it intermittently was an enormous saving attribute. 


VALENTINA SCHIVARDI

©Valentina Schivardi

Excellent thanks! How long did you document their ceremonies and are you still in touch with the community?
The first ceremony was back in 2009. Yes, we are still in touch – I’m still working on this project.

Just wondered why the men in this community were not featured so much in the photos?

I guess because women are more photogenic. I’m just kidding. Actually, there were more men than women featured in the editing I showed.

Is the project ongoing? what’s next?

Yes, it’s an ongoing project. I’d love to make a book next.

When you were working on the project were you thinking about making photographs for them at the same time as making pictures for yourself? Did you take different approach for these?

This is a very interesting question for me. Yes, when I’m working on this project I think about both taking pictures for them as well as for myself, which can be tricky. Luckily, it’s been clear in my head since the beginning: I was able to start this project because I was hired to take photos for them. This allowed me to find a point of entry to their community. When possible, I work with an assistant, to make sure that he/she can cover the event for them, so that I can focus on my own project.

Given that the subjects seemed very keen to pose, did you capture moments where subjects had their guards down?

Oh yes. This is a question I had in my head since the beginning. What makes a photograph a more authentic and honest representation of someone? On one hand, it’s fascinating to see how my subject is very conscious of the camera. There’s something very strong about the way they always seem to know exactly how to pose. On the other hand, I’m also interested in showing how contradictory and much more complex we can be, by trying to capture my subjects off guard.

Oh yes. This is a question I had in my head since the beginning. What makes a photograph a more authentic and honest representation of someone? On one hand, it’s fascinating to see how my subject is very conscious of the camera. There’s something very strong about the way they always seem to know exactly how to pose. On the other hand, I’m also interested in showing how contradictory and much more complex we can be, by trying to capture my subjects off guard.

Valentina Schivardi
http://valentinaschivardi.com/

Children: The forgotten future of Kashmir

Photos & text by Mubashir Hassan

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©Mubashir Hassan

Kashmir in the last 30 years has been reduced to a land of pain and misery with thousands dead, disappeared, raped, detained and tortured. When an anti-India insurgency began in 1989, the mighty forces that India employed here crushed the rebellion. Since then more than 90,000 people have died and 8,000are disappeared.

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©Mubashir Hassan

The ongoing conflict mounted scars not only on the adults but the new generation. The young children’s were badly affected with hundreds killed, thousands blinded, amputated bodies, and detained in Indian jails.

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©Mubashir Hassan

With more than half a million Indian troops stationed, Kashmir has the distinction of being the most heavily militarized zone in the world. The Indian forces enjoy special powers under laws such as the Armed Forces special Powers Act (AFSPA) that gives them immunity and impunity to arrest or kill anyone on mere suspicion, without the fear of facing legal action.

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©Mubashir Hassan

The turmoil has devastated an entire generation. People have gone through worst in these turbulent times. The story is all about the Children’s who are the Future of Kashmir and a yearning of new generation to live a life of peace and dignity.

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©Mubashir Hassan

The images shot by me are somehow my own childhood experiences, as I grew in such condition seeing things periodically right from the time when rebellion broke out in Kashmir.

Mubashir Hassan
Mubashir Hassan is a freelance photojournalist based in Kashmir valley, India. For the past six year, Mubashir has covered many stories on politics, conflict, human rights violations, as well as day to day life, art, culture and architecture. He is available for assignments.

On the project
‘Children: The forgotten future of Kashmir’ is an ongoing project by photojournalist Mubashir Hassan that focuses on the children living under the conflicted area of Kashmir valley. It documents the impact that the conflict has on their lives; from being physically maimed, psychologically traumatised and deprived of a future. ‘Children: The forgotten future of Kashmir’ is a personal project. It is an important story that needs to be seen and told. If you would like to support Mubashir, please be in touch with him. He is looking for commissions, representation and/or donations, which albeit small would make a huge difference for him. You can get in touch with Mubashir directly on:

Mubashir Hassan
T: +91-   9622663411
E: mubashirhassanpj@gmail.com
Insta: mubashirhassan_images